Celebrating 300 years

Shropshire Freemasons celebrated the United Grand Lodge of England's Tercentenary with a magnificent Choral Evensong in Shrewsbury Abbey on Sunday 1st October

With over 300 people in attendance, the banners of the Province were paraded into the Abbey and the brethren were invited to wear full regalia for the service. The event was held in the presence of Provincial Grand Master RW Bro Peter Taylor, his Deputy Roger Pemberton and many distinguished guests.

A procession of banners from the province lodges began proceedings with a pageant of colour and ceremony, with the Provincial Sword, Banner and Standard holding pride of place before the High Altar.

The sermon was preached by the Grand Chaplain Revd Canon Michael Wilson, and the service conducted by the Provincial Grand Chaplain Revd Phil Niblock.

The Abbey's great organ was also played by W Bro Jeremy Lund and as proceedings ended, it was agreed by all those in attendance that the Evensong was a memorable way to mark 300 years of Freemasonry.

On Saturday 14th October, Penarth Masonic Hall celebrated its 90th Anniversary with a special dinner to commemorate their forefathers foresight, exactly 90 years to the day

14th October 1927 was the date that the Foundation Stone was laid for the building of Penarth Masonic Hall by RW Bro Col Sir Charles L.D Venables Llewelyn, Bart., in a public ceremony attended by hundreds of people.

The Foundation Stone can be seen inside the Penarth Masonic Temple in the North East corner. As well as Sir Charles' association with the Hall through the Foundation Stone and the remarkable picture of that event, he also donated a chair which bears his name.

Sir Charles Venables Llewelyn was the Provincial Grand Master of South Wales Eastern Division from 1913 to 1938. Penarth Masonic Hall was one of two that he laid that Foundation Stone for during his tenure, the other being Maesteg in 1924.

He was also responsible for consecrating 30 Lodges throughout South Wales, although he was unable to be present at many due to his War Service. He was able to preside however, at Rhondda Lodge in Pontypridd, and Vale of Glamorgan Lodge in Barry, both in 1919.

Windsor Lodge was founded in 1878 and sought new premises, as its then home in Station Approach, Penarth - now Penarth British Legion - struggled to seat 250 members. Penarth Masonic Hall was built on playing fields at Stanwell Road, once used by Penarth Athletic Club. This was to accommodate the growth in Freemasonry due to the expansion of Cardiff & Penarth Docks.

The first sod was cut in 1927 by 87 year old Frederick George (Daddy) Hodges. The Grand Temple, which was open to the public recently as part of Cadw’s Open Heritage Events, has a magnificent domed ceiling decorated with stars and planets representing the Northern Heavens in September. It was designed Dan Jones, FRAS, and built by Tucker Bros, Broadway, Roath, Cardiff at a final cost of £10,500. The Hall was opened to coincide with the 50th Anniversary Jubilee of Windsor Lodge.

During a fine meal, pictures of the Founding Forefathers and of the historic laying of the Foundation Stone were projected on a large screen, as well as pictures of all the Honours Boards. Paul Haley, Provincial Communications Officer for South Wales, then explained how the evening had enabled past, present and future Freemasons to dine together and look ahead in making the Hall fit for another 90 years, as well as giving a brief history of the Hall. Chris Pratt of Windsor Lodge then gave a Toast to Penarth Masonic Hall, before a further toast was taken from special commemorative shot glasses that were manufactured for the occasion.

All proceeds from the evening will go to making the building fit for another 90 years and, of course, to prepare for its Centenary.

Thanks to support from Leicestershire and Rutland Freemasons, along with Leicestershire County Council and The Woodland Trust, the Bradgate Park Trust has been able to dedicate an area for quiet reflection known as the Memorial Wood which was officially opened by Pro Grand Master Peter Lowndes on 5th October 2017

In glorious autumnal sunshine, over 200 people witnessed the Pro Grand Master unveil a bronze plaque at the entrance of the Memorial Wood which was followed by a suitable short dedication by the Grand Chaplain Michael Wilson. The Provincial Grand Master of Leicestershire and Rutland, RW Bro David Hagger then called upon Peter Osborne, Chairman of the Bradgate Park Trust, to formally accept the Memorial Wood into the care of the Trustees.

The Memorial Wood is an area of woodland to the side of the accessible carriageway that crosses the Park. It offers a tranquil setting overlooking Cropston Reservoir and is reached by a natural stone path. Rich in native wildlife species, the area is bound by traditional metal deer fencing, has seating and a central cast iron deer sculpture, set on a natural stone plinth.

Peter Tyldesley, Director of the Bradgate Park Trust, said: 'Bradgate Park is a special place for many people and one that is held close to the hearts of visitors and their families. We have been able to dedicate an area for quiet reflection as the Park’s Memorial Wood next to the main carriageway that crosses the Park.

'Bradgate Park’s Bronze Oak Leaves are inspired by the ancient trees of the Park and are a perfect way to celebrate weddings, birthdays and anniversaries, or to remember someone special. They are individually cast in bronze and displayed as a lasting memento on distinctive feature wooden pillars, made from oak from the Estate, within the natural setting of Memorial Wood.'

Bradgate Park, consisting of 900 acres, is the historic home of Lady Jane Grey, the nine day Queen, and was presented in Trust in perpetuity in 1928 by Charles Bennion to the County of Leicestershire and City of Leicester, as an open or Public Park for the purposes of recreation.

The generosity of Charles Bennion has ensured that generations of the local and wider community have had access to the beautiful park, which also supports the protection of wildlife, particularly the herd of deer that freely roam the park. It is the eighth most visited park of its kind in the country. Charles Bennion was also a prominent local Freemason, a Master of four Lodges and was Provincial Grand Treasurer.

RW Bro David Hagger: 'This Memorial Wood will leave a lasting legacy for the people of Leicestershire and Rutland as part of our 300th anniversary celebrations. We therefore felt that with the connection of Charles Bennion with both Bradgate Park and Freemasonry, that this Memorial Wood was a perfect project to fund.

'I must also thank the members of my Tercentenary Committee for their help and assistance, in particular W Bro Andy Green and W Bro Dale Page. It would also be remiss of me not to mention Peter Tyldesley, the Director of Bradgate Park, and his staff, for without their considerable efforts and assistance this project would literally would not have got off the ground.'

If you have any questions about Bradgate Park’s Bronze Oak Leaves and how to inscribe them with a message of your choice, please call 0116 2362713 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Cumberland and Westmorland Freemasons have donated a grant of £8,000 to help victims of the recent flooding in Millom and Haverigg

Heavy rain in these areas last weekend resulted in an estimated 300 homes being flooded. Many of these properties have no insurance, as a result of being flooded on previous occasions.

The Provincial Grand Master of Cumberland and Westmorland, RW Bro Norman Thompson DL, announced the grant during a meeting with the Mayor of Millom, Councillor Angela Dixon.

Of the £8,000 grant, £5,000 comes through the Masonic Charitable Foundation, with remaining £3,000 coming directly from Provincial funds.

Councillor Angela Dixon, Mayor of Millom, said: 'I’m very grateful to Cumberland and Westmorland Freemasons for their generous grant. The recent flooding in Millom and Haverigg hit us very hard and we need all the help we can get to get back on our feet.'

RW Bro Norman Thompson DL said: 'Having your home flooded is a terrible blow for anyone. In this case it’s even worse as these are homes that have flooded before and for which insurance was often unobtainable.

'I am pleased that we can offer a little help to our neighbours in Millom when they need it.'

A blue plaque has been unveiled on Cardiff Masonic Hall in Guildford Crescent to commemorate 263 years of Freemasonry within Cardiff

Brian Langley, the Chairman of Cardiff Masonic Hall, was invited to join the Provincial Grand Master for South Wales Gareth Jones OBE in the task of unveiling the blue plaque.

The plaque now sits secured proudly above the front doors of Cardiff Masonic Hall for all to see. It was also proudly shown to all those who recently visited the Hall as part of the CADW Open Doors Heritage Initiative during September 2017.

Original records show Corinthian Lodge No. 226, the first Cardiff Lodge, was warranted in August 1754.

Lodges met at the Cardiff Arms Hotel until 1855, when moved to its own premises at 4 Church Street. Again, with the growth in membership, new lodge premises were established in Working Street on 12 January 1877.

In 1893, the United Methodist Church was determined to sell their building in Guildford Street and relocate. The premises were originally built in 1863 for the United Methodist Church at an initial cost of £1600 and boasted seating for 800 parishioners.

The architect Mr John Hartland was well known at the time and other Cardiff examples of his work still in existence are Capel Tabernacle Welsh Baptist Church in the Hayes and Bethany Baptist Church in Wharton Street, now incorporated into Howells department store. 

Three Masonic Lodges, Glamorgan Lodge No. 36, Bute Lodge No. 960 and Tennant Lodge No. 1992, who were at that time meeting above a potato store in Wharton Street, made an offer of £4,500 which was accepted. In 1894, the Cardiff Masonic Hall Company was incorporated, funded by member's subscriptions raising the necessary sum plus a further £2,300 for alterations and furnishings.

The premises were finally opened to Freemasonry on 26th September 1895 by the Provincial Grand Master Lord Llangattock, who presided over its first meeting assisted by officers of Provincial Grand Lodge and distinguished brethren totalling around 500.

The building is based in design on Regency Classical coupled with the ancient Doric architecture of Greece.

In 1904 the building was fitted with Electric Lighting at the expense of the Master of Duke of York Lodge. A suitable illuminated scroll was presented to him in recognition of his gift.

In 1918 and in the following eight years, the directors acquired the cottages to the north of the building. These acquisitions enabled the building of a new temple which was named after the Deputy Provincial Grand Master of that time, Edgar Rutter.

The contribution to the community during those 263 years is immeasurable and represents a social history of the life and times of an emerging capital city from its beginnings.

South Wales Freemasons are celebrating the Tercentenary 300 years of Freemasonry within the United Grand Lodge of England and are affixing blue plaques to many of its Masonic Halls across South Wales.

Nearly 1,000 Freemasons and their families gathered for a special evening of thanks and celebration in style in the world heritage site that is Durham Cathedral in September, as the Province of Durham marked the United Grand Lodge of England’s Tercentenary

As well as brethren and their families from all corners of the Province, the Provincial Grand Master RW Bro Eric Heaviside was honoured to have as his special guests HM Lord-Lieutenant of County Durham, Mrs Sue Snowdon, His Worship the Mayor of Durham, Councillor Bill Kellett, the Dean of Durham, the Very Reverend Andrew Tremlett and the Assistant Grand Master RW Bro Sir David Wootton.

With the cathedral near to capacity, the service was conducted with precision and splendour; tributes associated with any formal Provincial Masonic occasion and with Durham Cathedral. Looking across the cathedral, the rows of pews were awash with gold and masonic blue. The evening was further enhanced with hymns from both the Cathedral Choir and Durham’s very own Masonic Choir, conducted by W Bro Paul Debenham.

In the middle of the service, the Dean of Durham handed over proceedings to the Provincial Grand Master who conducted a special award presentation from Durham Benevolence, distributing £100,000 in community support grants to 10 local charities and organisations who support children or young adults in need.

Award Recipients included:

  • Sunderland Minster – £25,800
  • Friends of Carlton Camp (Hartlepool) – £10,000
  • Enter CIC (Ferryhill) – £10,000
  • Cheesy Waffles (Durham) – £10,000
  • Home on the Range (Spennymoor) – £10,000
  • Heel & Toe Children’s Charity (Chester-le-Street) – £10,000
  • 2505 Squadron RAF Air Cadets (Bishop Auckland) – £10,000
  • Co Durham Young Farmers Clubs (Durham) – £7,000
  • Kayaks (South Shields) – £5,000
  • Hug In a Bag (Durham and Darlington) – £5,000

After the presentation, the Dean delivered his sermon, in particular paying tribute to the charitable giving of Durham Freemasons and went on to commend the very foundations on which Freemasonry is built – a respect for one another, kindness, honesty and trust.

Once again, the Province of Durham showed that when they do something, they do it in style. A wonderful evening was enjoyed by all who attended, with the Tercentenary celebrated in a fitting manner and local worthy causes supported for the future.

As part of their Tercentenary celebrations, Cumberland and Westmorland Freemasons have donated a brand new fully equipped and liveried motorcycle to Blood Bikes Cumbria to support them in their vital work across Cumbrian communities

The bike carries the Province of Cumberland and Westmorland’s provincial emblem and the square and compasses symbol.

Since May 2014, Blood Bikes Cumbria have provided an out of hours, 365 days a year transport service for urgently needed blood, drugs, human tissue and other medical requirements between hospitals, medical centres and blood banks across Cumbria. The Great North Air Ambulance Service also receives supplies daily to keep their helicopters stocked.

Blood Bikes Cumbria is run entirely by volunteers, the drivers all undergo specialist advanced training to operate the bikes under ‘blue light’ conditions. There is also a specialist team of volunteer dispatchers who take calls and co-ordinate the deliveries.

At a special presentation evening in Kendal, the motorcycle was handed over to a team of drivers from Blood Bikes Cumbria by Past Pro Grand Master The Marquess of Northampton and Provincial Grand Master, Rt W Bro Norman James Thompson DL.

W Bro Thompson said: ‘The Freemasons of Cumberland and Westmorland are delighted to be able to support this relatively new charity who do vital work for our Cumbrian communities, often behind the scenes.

‘Our brethren and families will be pleased to see this motorcycle put to good work for the benefit of all who need emergency medical supplies in the county.’

Sunday 3rd September may have been cold and wet in rural Wiltshire, but that didn't stop over 1,000 Freemasons and their families from braving the elements to attend Salisbury Cathedral for a very special evensong service

The Provincial Grand Master RW Bro Philip Bullock welcomed civic leaders including the Lord Lieutenant of Wiltshire Mrs Sarah Rose Troughton, who was accompanied by her husband Mr Peter Troughton CBE, as well as the High Sheriff Lady Marland who joined Masonic leaders RW Bro Anthony Wilson and RW Bro George Francis PAGM for lunch before the service. 

The service itself was the culmination of two years preparatory work by Assistant Provincial Grand Master W Bro Stephen Bridge who worked very closely with Canon Precentor Rev Tom Clammer in organising the event.

W Bro Stephen Bridge said: ‘It was a truly remarkable event - looking down the nave of the Cathedral it was quite incredible to see so many people present and proudly wearing Masonic regalia, which was a moment of intense and humbling delight and something that will stay fresh in the memory for many years to come. It’s at times like these that all of the planning, negotiation and apprehension became worthwhile.

‘We have celebrated the Tercentenary in Wiltshire’s most beautiful and impressive place of worship. In doing so we have not only honoured those Brethren who founded the first Grand Lodge, but also the generations of operative masons who built and maintain such an inspiring building. I can think of no more appropriate place for us to mark such an important Masonic event and I trust we have also contributed to the start of a mutually supportive relationship with the Cathedral, something that can only help promote Freemasonry in Wiltshire and beyond.’

RW Bro Philip Bullock was effusive in his praise of the event and the support it received. He commented: ‘It was a thrill to see the nave of the Cathedral so full. The support was quite amazing and we had Brethren from every part of the Province attending. It was also a particular pleasure to welcome members of the three branches of our Masonic Widows Association.’

By attending a service that was part of the Cathedral’s ordained pattern of worship, Wiltshire Freemasons provided an admirable public window, helping local communities understand the true values of Freemasonry. It is hoped that the service might be repeated in the not too distant future.

Please scroll through the gallery at the top to view photos from the service

To celebrate the United Grand Lodge of England's Tercentenary, Derbyshire Freemasons made awards to 14 charities in the county, totalling £25,000

The awards recognise the good work these charities do for local people and the impact their work has on the community. As well as a financial contribution, each charity was presented with a crystal award engraved with the charity name and the Derbyshire provincial logo.

Pictured on 26th July at Pride Park Stadium in Derby, the Provincial Grand Lodge of Derbyshire held their first ever Community Charity Awards ceremonial dinner.

Stepping Stones

The first award was to a Centre in Heanor who care for the elderly during the day. Stepping Stones provide transport to the centre where fresh hot meals and drinks are provided as well as entertainment and professional care. They were represented by Jo Dixon, Eileen Cheeseman and Julie Riley.

The Drop Inn

In 1999 in Belper, reports of the youth of the town causing trouble, taking drugs, taking part in vandalism and intimidation prompted one person to address the concerns of those young people. She didn't believe that they could all be so bad. That person was Andrea Fox and in 2000, The Drop Inn was founded where the young people set the ground rules and formulated the policies and since then it has grown and developed into what today is a Foundation for Youth Innovation. They were represented by Andrea Fox and Layton Davies.

Fairplay

In Chesterfield, Fairplay are a group whose aim is to improve the lives of children and young people with disabilities. They offer support to children and young people up to the age of 25 and to their parents and siblings. That support is in the form of play schemes, Saturday clubs, youth clubs, activity days, independent living groups, parent support groups and family trips for parents and siblings. Representing them at the event were Thomas Boden, Elaine Pauk, John Chambers and Heather Fawbert.

The Place Project

Housing expansion in villages brings all sorts of problems for schools, doctor's surgeries and shops. It also creates a need for somewhere for youngsters to play, and two years ago The Place Project was established as a community group to transform the run- down and underused recreation ground that serves the villages of Crich, Fritchley and Whatstandwell. Whilst the local Parish Council gave them a small grant over three years they realised that nothing would happen without hard work and a willingness to raise the money needed.

They are now on their way, progress is being made and a re-vamped playground and recreation ground are no longer just a pipe-dream. Representing the Group were Paul Yorke, Carole Bowskill and Ian and Caroline Pendleton.

Derbyshire Children’s Holiday Centre

Derbyshire Children’s' Holiday Centre were probably the oldest Charity amongst the recipients on the evening. Established in 1891, the Charity provides holidays for children from Derbyshire whose lives are such that they will benefit from a change to and respite from their daily lives. They were represented by Bill Tomlinson and David Harris.

The Hardy Group

“Life doesn't end when Dementia begins”

That is the opening line on the website of The Hardy Group, a thriving group of people living with dementia, as well as current and past carers who through their own experiences support each other along their journey with dementia.  A Foundation Derbyshire Awards winner in 2016, they were represented by Bernard Crowther and Dave Roberts.

Helen's Trust

Based in Bakewell in North Derbyshire and The High Peak, Helen's Trust is an end of life Charity which provides support to terminally ill people who wish to be cared for and to die at home. They fund and co-ordinate non-nursing care such as sitting services overnight and regular carer respite during the day.

Now in their 16th year, they work with respect, compassion and dignity and are motivated to go that extra mile for the beneficiary showing professionalism and a willingness to become engaged with and embedded in the local communities of North Derbyshire. Zoe Woodward and Debbie Fennell were there to collect their award.

Careline

In the Derbyshire Dales and based at St Oswald's Hospital in Ashbourne are a group called Careline. Careline offers a free telephone befriending service to people in the Derbyshire Dales. They aim to make people's lives better by calling those who feel in need of support – they could be elderly, less able to get out, recently bereaved, lonely or isolated but Careline offer friendship and a social interaction. Representing them were Annette Eley and Gordon Hart.

P3 Artemis House

People from all walks of life and through a variety of circumstances can find themselves homeless - the Erewash area is no different to many others. P3 Artemis House in Long Eaton provides a safe place for homeless adults to live and combines with it a personalised support package to tackle the root cause of their homelessness.. Erewash Borough Council work closely with them and often refer those in need to them. Representing them were Jo Fieldhouse, Christine Nutt, Kerry Dungavel and Katrina Bucklehurst.

Long Eaton and District Friendly Invalid and Handicapped Group

This group was recommended for their work in helping the disabled and those with an invalidity. They are called the Long Eaton & District Friendly Invalid & Handicapped Group who have been in existence for over 50 years. Their aim is to create an outlet not only for the handicapped but also for able-bodied elderly individuals who rarely get the opportunity to do anything or see anyone. Amonst the representatives were Mahrie Harvey, Kath Haywood, Beryl Ash and Marion Drage.

The Chapel-en-le-Frith Mobile Physiotherapy Service

Some years ago, a charity called The Chapel-en-le-Frith Mobile Physiotherapy Service was started whose objects were to promote and maintain a mobile physiotherapy service in the rural district of Chapel-en-le-Frith, and to make available treatment to patients physically incapable of attending hospital and who were not able to afford the cost of home treatment by a private physiotherapist.

That service has been welcomed by all those living in the area and is recognised as having made a difference to the lives of all those who use it. Representing the service was Lesley Boler.

The Bureau

In Glossop, North Derbyshire, is a charity called The Bureau or Glossop's Voluntary and Community Network. They believe that all members of the community will have both support needs of their own and a capacity to support others at various times in their lives – in some cases simultaneously.

They offer a huge range of services which include helping people who are struggling to manage, or live independently by accessing a wide range of local services. Julie Farley, Cheryl Pike, John Harris and Martin Gallagher were there to collect their award.

Shoutout

Shoutout is an inclusive group in South Derbyshire for people with additional needs, and also for their families and friends. They aim to encourage people of all abilities to come together on equal terms and to encourage inclusion within the wider community. Representing them were Kia Higham, Sue Dixon, Kim Coe and Robert Coe.

Staunton Harold Sailability Trust 

The final award went to the Staunton Harold Sailability Trust - a relatively new charity who offer sailing to children with physical or mental disabilities. Whilst the charity may be new it will continue the work of the sailing club at Staunton Harold who have been supporting sailing for children and young adults with varying disabilities for the past 15 years. Representing them were Kevin and Lesley Needham and Richard and Jackie Tivey.

Cliff jump raises over £1,000 for Masonic Charitable Foundation

Tony Andrews and Digby Lund, both from Lodge of Science and Art No. 8429 in Loughborough, made a jump off a cliff in Malaga on Sunday 3rd September 2017 for the Masonic Charitable Foundation 2022 Festival

The 2022 Festival aims to raise £1.8 million by Leicestershire and Rutland Freemasons over the next five years.

The pair have so far raised over £1,200, and Digby’s wife Yvonne also jumped for charity with Tony's wife Elanor providing moral support. 

Having arrived at Alumnecar, the group were met by their paraglider pilots, Antonio and Jose, who arrived by air demonstrating how best to land. The intrepid paragliders were taken up into the hills along a single track road via numerous hairpin bends to the take-off site. The launch site was on the south side of a sharp ridge offering wonderful views out to sea.

Having arranged the wing, the pilots set about strapping themselves and their guests into their harnesses after which a full safety briefings were delivered. They were then given take-off instructions to simply to run down the slope until the ground fell away.

The flights down were very smooth and offered amazing views out to sea and along the coast. Digby's flight showed the advantage of being so much taller than Antonio when taking off from such a steep slope, a couple of steps and then off into the blue yonder. 

Tony said: ‘We were all lucky enough to have relatively good landings, though I did collect a lot of the beach in my shoes and some in my knees.’

Digby said: ‘Having all safely returned to terra firma, we exchanged feelings about our flights, the heightened heart rate before and during take-off, the gradual relaxing as the flight continued and then the increasing tension as the ground rapidly approached. We all agreed the venture had been well worthwhile and hope the donations will fully reflect our efforts.’

Leicestershire and Rutland Provincial Grand Master David Hagger said: ‘Congratulations to Digby and Tony for their fundraising efforts and I'm pleased to learn they landed safely without harm.’

You can still sponsor Digby and Tony by clicking here

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