Six Yorkshire organisations will share a £123,000 'major grants' windfall from the region’s Freemasons

The financial donations – which range in value from £10,000 to £38,000 – will be presented to the recipients at the Province of Yorkshire West Riding’s annual meeting, being held at Harrogate’s Royal Hall on the afternoon of Tuesday, May 7. 

Representatives from the six organisations will be presented with their individual cheques by their Provincial Grand Master, David Pratt, at the event which will be attended by hundreds of Freemasons from Yorkshire’s four counties and further afield. Those organisations receiving grants are: 

  • Martin House Children’s Hospice, based in Boston Spa, will receive £38,000 to buy a new specialist adapted vehicle to transport up to three children and a carer. It will also accommodate children in their increasingly more complex wheelchairs
  • The Northwest Specialist Inclusive Learning Centre – Green Meadows School, Guiseley – has been awarded £25,000 to help create and equip an outdoor play facility
  • Old Earth School, based in Elland, is being given £20,000 towards an all-weather sports pitch and running track for use by the school and the local community
  • Bramley Elderly Action, based in Bramley, will receive £20,000 to enable them to replace their existing 18-year-old minibus ensuring that immobile elders able to get out and about
  • Mission Trinity, based in Goole, is getting £10,000 to relocate and equip its food bank
  • Paces Sheffield, based in Sheffield, will receive £10,000 to purchase a range of specialist school equipment, enabling children to develop their skills and confidence to achieve maximum levels of physical, social and emotional independence. 

Provincial Grand Master David Pratt, said: 'It is an absolute honour to be able to present these six different, yet equally deserving, organisations with their grants, and I look forward to doing so at our Provincial Grand Lodge annual meeting in Harrogate. 

'This money has all been raised by individual Freemasons from throughout our Province and I am extremely grateful for their generosity and continued support of one of our three grand principles, namely charity. 

'Charity is, and always has been, at the heart of Freemasonry, and it will continue to be so for as long as our ancient and honourable institution exists.'

Sarah Smith from Martin House said: 'We are delighted to receive the support of the Freemasons, and this vehicle will make a huge difference to us. It will enable us to take children and young people on more trips and outings, helping them to enjoy more activities and make precious memories during their stays at Martin House.'

The Province of Yorkshire North and East Ridings have helped to fund research, which has been published in the British Journal of Cancer, alongside The Masonic Samaritan Fund, Yorkshire Cancer Research, Prostate Cancer UK and the British Columbia Cancer Agency Strategic Priorities Fund

Medical research scientists at the University of York have found a way of distinguishing between fatal prostate cancer and manageable cancer, which could reduce unnecessary surgeries and radiotherapy.

A recent study showed that for every single life saved through surgical intervention more than 25 men were unnecessarily treated with surgery or radiotherapy. Success rates could be hindered by treating all prostate cancers in the same way. A team at the University of York and the University of British Columbia in Canada have designed a test that can pick out life-threatening prostate cancers, with up to 92% accuracy.

Professor Norman Maitland, from the University of York’s Department of Biology and director of Yorkshire Cancer Research, said: ‘Unnecessary prostate treatment has both physical consequences for patients and their families, but is also a substantial financial burden on the NHS, where each operation will cost around £10,000. 

‘Cancers that are contained in the prostate, however, have the potential to be ‘actively monitored’ which is not only cheaper but has far fewer negative side-effects in patients with non-life threatening cancer.’

It is now understood that to find the differing levels of cancer, scientists have to identify genes that have been altered in different cancer types.

Professor Norman Maitland added: ‘In some diseases, such as cancer, genes can be switched to an opposite state, causing major health issues and a threat to life. To put it another way: how do we distinguish the tiger cancer cells from the pussycat cancer cells when there are millions of patterns of chemical alterations going on, many of which will be perfectly healthy?’

Dr Davide Pellacani, who began these studies in York, before moving to the University of British Columbia, said: ‘Using this computer analysis, not only could we see which tissue samples had cancer and which didn’t, but also which cancers were dangerous and which ones less so.’

To take this method out of the laboratory, the team are now investigating a further trial with new cancer samples and hope to involve a commercial partner to allow this to be used for patients being treated in the NHS.

Local scout Will Stanway was a special guest at the Denison Lodge No. 1248 meeting in December 2018, when he gave a presentation to members, friends and families

Along with six others from Scarborough, Will has been selected to join 29 Yorkshire scouts in attending the World Scout Jamboree in July 2019. This will be held at Summit Bechtel Reserve, West Virginia, USA, with over 45,000 participants from around the world. The Jamboree is an educational event that brings together the world’s scouts to promote peace and mutual understanding and to develop leadership and life skills.

Will explained to the lodge in the Province of Yorkshire, North & East Ridings that participants were required to raise £3,620 sponsorship towards travel costs, events, equipment and training camps. A portion of the money would also assist an International Solidarity Fund helping Scouts from less economically developed countries to attend and participate on an equal footing.

Will outlined how he had researched the historical similarities and connections with Freemasons and how both organisations share the same values and approach to life in helping others.

A total of £900 has since been donated for Will’s life-changing experience – Leopold Lodge No. 1760 donated £300, Denison Lodge £100 and the Freemasons Charity Yorkshire North and East Riding (FCYNER) donated £500.

On a cold Saturday in October 2017, a group of founding members of a proposed new lodge met at Dagger Lane Masonic Hall in Hull, to commence the formation of an old-style Lodge, to be called Phoenix Lodge

It was formulated on the style of an old lodge located in Hull in the early 19th century. The original Phoenix Lodge No. 368 (later renumbered No. 256 and erased in 1836) used to conduct their regular meetings in an upstairs room of various private premises and the Ship Inn restaurant in Hull, with lodge workings and business conducted around a table.

The new Phoenix Lodge will have a mix of old Masonic traditions, including its own unique ritual which incorporates elements of the ‘Ancient’ workings and with these elements, of meeting in a public house and style of ritual, it will make Phoenix Lodge a very special and singular lodge for the Hull area and indeed, the Province of Yorkshire, North & East Ridings.

After much hard work by founding members, on 20th October 2018, the ‘new’ Phoenix Lodge No. 9963 was duly consecrated at Beverley Road Masonic Hall in Hull.

The new lodge will meet five times a year with meetings commencing at 7pm. To keep costs down, there will be no festive board (Installations excepted), although this will not prevent those who wish enjoying a convivial meal, at a local eatery pre or post meeting should they wish.

It’s the journey  that matters

Via Rolls-Royce, camper van, horse and cart, speedboat and tandem bicycle, Lifelites chief executive Simone Enefer-Doy travelled 2,500 miles in two weeks to raise the profile of this hard-working charity

Providing life-changing assistive technology, Lifelites helps the 10,000 children and young people in hospices across the British Isles live their short lives to the full. On 25 May 2018, the charity’s chief executive, Simone Enefer-Doy, set off on an epic road, air and river trip to spread the word and raise funds.

The 2,500-mile challenge, called Lift for Lifelites, was to take in 47 famous landmarks in England and Wales in just 14 days. For each leg of the journey, Simone received a lift from Provincial supporters in an eclectic mix of transportation. After setting an initial target of raising £50,000 for Lifelites, the total now stands at over £104,000. Simone says she has been astounded at the support and generosity she encountered as she travelled around the country. 

‘Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine that so many people would come out to meet me on my journey and support my challenge. We have received a terrific welcome wherever we have gone, and it really spurred me on to continue whenever I felt myself flagging. I would like to thank everyone – drivers, donors and venues – for helping to make Lift for Lifelites happen. We couldn’t have done it without you.’

If you’d like Lifelites to come to one of your Provincial meetings to make a presentation about Simone’s adventure and how the charity will use the money, please get in touch via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 0207 440 4200.

Published in Lifelites

At the Craft and Royal Arch meetings of the Provincial Grand Lodge of Yorkshire, North & East Ridings, it was announced that the Festival had raised £1,881,413

Provincial Grand Master Jeffrey Gillyon and Assistant Grand Master Sir David Wootton addressed the gathering at York Racecourse, where the news that the Province had exceeded its target of £1.6 million was revealed.

Lifelites Chief Executive Simone Enefer-Doy has left Freemasons' Hall to kick-start her 2,500 mile journey to 47 famous landmarks to raise awareness of Lifelites and £50,000 for the charity

Dubbed 'A Lift for Lifelites', Simone will see Freemasons in nearly every Province in England and Wales and will be stopping at landmarks such as Hadrian’s Wall, Angel of the North and Bletchley Park in vehicles including a classic Rolls Royce, a camper van, a four seater plane, an E Type Jaguar and even a zip wire.

Simone said: 'With the help of Freemasons and their vehicles around the country, I’m on a mission to raise the profile of our work and raise more funds to reach more children whose lives could be transformed by the technology we can provide.'

We'll be updating this page regularly, including images, as Simone continues on her epic quest.

Day 14 – Thursday 7 June

That's a wrap! Simone completed her 14 day challenge and finished in style on ThamesJet speedboat with guests including United Grand Lodge of England Chief Executive Dr David Staples. Her fundraising currently stands at over £103,000.

Day 13 – Wednesday 6 June

It's the penultimate day, starting with a trip to Bedfordshire at the Shuttleworth Collection. The next stop was Silverstone racetrack in Northamptonshire, which included completing a lap in a Jaguar, before driving this to Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire. The last trip was to the home, studios and gardens of former artist Henry Moore in Hertfordshire.

Day 12 – Tuesday 5 June

Day 12 took in journeys across Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire. The first stop was Gordon Boswell Romany Museum in Lincolnshire before using two vehicles, a Hudson Straight Six Touring Sedan and a Range Rover, to Bressington Steam and Gardens in Norfolk. There was still time to grab lunch at Bury St Edmunds Abbey in Suffolk before a BMW took Simone to her final stop in Cambridgeshire, which included a punt on the River Cam.

Day 11 – Monday 4 June

Simone crammed in four locations to start the week, with a wide variety of vehicles used. The day started in Yorkshire Sculpture Park before driving a 1977 Bentley to the National Tramway Museum in Derbyshire. It was from here that Simone then picked up a DeLorean to take her to Newstead Abbey in Nottinghamshire before completing the day by driving a gold Rolls-Royce to Victoria Park in Leicestershire.

Day 10 – Sunday 3 June

The week concludes with trips to Northumberland, Durham and Yorkshire and East Riding, as well as the news that Simone had already hit her £50,000 target. Trips included the Millennium Bridge in Northumberland, the Angel of the North and a scenic drive across the Yorkshire Moors to Bolton Castle.

Day 9 – Saturday 2 June

Day nine saw visits to the Provinces of West Lancashire and Cumberland and Westmorland, with landmarks including Hadrian’s Wall in Cumbria and transport provided by a horse and cart.

Day 8 – Friday 1 June

Two Rolls-Royces helped provide the transport on day nine, with Simone starting at the Avoncroft Museum in Worcestershire, driving down to New Place in Warwickshire and then to the National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire. There was still time to conclude the day by visiting Manchester Cathedral in East Lancashire.

Day 7 – Thursday 31 May

At the halfway point, Simone made trips to Cheshire, Shropshire and Herefordshire – starting out at the Georgian Hall Dunham Massey, then heading to the RAF Museum Cosford in a custom built Rewaco Bike and finally, to Arthur’s Stone.

Day 6 – Wednesday 30 May

Day six was solely focused in North Wales where Simone took on the challenge of the fastest zip wire in the world. This was then followed by making the journey to Chester in a six month old blue McLaren Spider and flanked by the Widows’ Sons motorcyclists and Blood Bike volunteers.

Day 5 – Tuesday 29 May

Day five was a journey across the borders for Simone as she ventured to Oxfordshire before heading west to Monmouthshire and continued to South Wales and West Wales. Landmarks included Radcliffe Camera in Oxford, Caerleon Amphitheatre in Newport, the Donald Gordon theatre in Cardiff and ending the day in the county town of Carmarthen to meet the Provincial Grand Lodge of West Wales.

Day 4 – Monday 28 May

Simone began day four by driving an Aston Martin DB9 to the Grand Pier in Weston-super-Mare with help from the Provincial Grand Lodge of Somerset. A 1928 MG Riley saloon then took Simone to her next port of call, Clifton Suspension Bridge where the Provincial Grand Lodge of Bristol had a 1966 Austin Mini Cooper waiting to take her to Caen Hill Locks. It was here that Simone met representatives from the Provincial Grand Lodge of Wiltshire, before the final stop of the day saw her clock up the miles to Shaw House in Berkshire to be greeted by members of the Provincial Grand Lodge of Berkshire.

Day 3 – Sunday 27 May

Day three involved journeys to Dorset, Devon and Cornwall. It started with a visit to Lulworth Cove in Dorset to be met by members from the Provincial Grand Lodge in a yellow camper van and to receive a donation of £2,000. Simone then ventured to Buckfast Abbey to receive a donation of £5,000 from the Provincial Grand Lodge of Devonshire before departing in a classic Rover to head to Lanhydrock House and Garden in Cornwall, where she received another donation of £1,750.

Day 2 – Saturday 26 May

Simone took to the sky for day two, meeting a representative from the Provincial Grand Lodge of Hampshire and Isle of Wight who drove her to Southampton to board a flight to Jersey, to meet members of the Provincial Grand Lodge of Guernsey and Alderney.

Day 1 – Friday 25 May

Simone has begun her challenge, leaving in a taxi escorted by a fleet of Widows Sons motorcyclists. This is the start of her 14 day road trip with a difference, using a variety of unusual and extraordinary forms of transport.

The next destination for Friday was Richmond Park where Simone was met by representatives from the Provincial Grand Lodge of Middlesex after arriving in a Porsche 550 Spyder. Further destinations included Guildford Cathedral, where Simone was met by a Noddy car, and Brighton Royal Pavilion, where the Provincial Grand Lodge of Sussex made a donation of £5,000.

Lifelites has a package of their magical technology at every children’s hospice across the British Isles and their work is entirely funded by donations. Through the journey they are seeking to raise £50,000 – that’s the cost of one of their projects for four years.

You can sponsor Simone by clicking here

Published in Lifelites

Following the burning down of Jubilee Park in East Yorkshire by vandals, a local appeal was launched to restore it to its former glory

Freemasons in the Province of Yorkshire, North and East Ridings felt it was a worthwhile project and following a donation from St Saviour Lodge of Installed Masters No. 8433, a successful petition was made to the Freemasons Charity of Yorkshire North and East Riding.

This led to a further significant donation, which went a long way towards helping a major fundraising campaign which raised almost £40,000 to buy new equipment for the children's play park.

The official re-opening was held on 7th May 2018, with the Immediate Past Master of St Saviour lodge Bryan Redshaw asked to assist with the ribbon cutting.

Imperial College Lodge No. 4536 has made a donation of £4,000 to CASE Training Services – a charity based in Hull which supports young people with learning difficulties

CASE was founded over 30 years ago by Yorkshire Freemason Andrew Peach and his wife Mary to provide work-related training for their daughter Alison and her disabled friends. Alison had Down’s Syndrome and passed away in 2016.

The donation has been used to purchase 10 iPads, together with a secure docking unit. They will be used in supervised groups for art work, music, literacy, numeracy and photography projects.

Andrew, who is a member of Imperial College Lodge and Andrew Marvell Lodge No. 5642 in the Province of Yorkshire North & East Ridings, and Mary attended the CASE Christmas lunch in December last year to present the cheque to a group of Trainees.

The Lodge also made a separate donation of £500 to Mires Beck Nursery, another charity in East Yorkshire, which helps people with learning difficulties and which Alison attended towards the end of her life.

A Masonic Express adventure in Yorkshire

As part of the United Grand Lodge of England’s Tercentenary celebrations, the Province of Yorkshire, North and East Ridings hired a steam train for 300 Freemasons, including their friends and family

The Province kept the number at 300, to coincide with the 300th anniversary of the formation of the world’s first Grand Lodge for Freemasons.

The steam train was operated by the North York Moors Railway and ran between Pickering and Whitby, North Yorkshire. A metal plate was fabricated with the words Masonic Express in blue and white, which was affixed to and adorned the front of the engine.

In glorious sunshine, the event was presented as a family day out and the journey was set at a sedate pace through stunning countryside.

On arrival at Whitby Railway Station, in the centre of the town, the fun-filled 300 walked into the heart of this historic port to either take in some shopping, eat in the seafood restaurants or, for the more adventurous, climb up to the derelict Whitby Abbey, which is perched high on a cliff.

On arrival back in Pickering, the smiles on the faces of the 300 people was testament to the satisfaction of having enjoyed a fabulous family fun day together.

And as a result of the success of the Masonic Express adventure, the Provincial Grand Master RW Bro Jeffrey Gillyon expressed an interest in running another steam train in the future.

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