The laying of a commemorative flagstone in Ripon Cathedral formed an integral part of the Province of Yorkshire, West Riding’s annual service of thanksgiving

It is engraved: ‘The Province of Yorkshire, West Riding and the Masonic Charitable Foundation supported restoration work in the Cathedral to mark 300 years of Freemasonry 1717-2017.’

Tuesday, 13 March 2018 00:00

Pipe band leads the way for Bolton

Bolton District Freemasons took the opportunity to parade to the local parish church in honour of the Tercentenary celebrations in East Lancashire

Members of all ranks wore their regalia, braved the elements and were preceded by the Bolton Caledonia Pipe Band.

When Bristol’s Freemasons’ Hall was destroyed by bombing in November 1940, almost the entire contents of the Library and Museum were lost

As well as destroying the lodge and chapter rooms, many portraits of Past Provincial Grand Masters and their Deputies were ruined. Black and white photographs of many of these masons, however, had been published in various books.  

Hannah Baker is a young English artist who was commissioned to reproduce several of the lost Bristol portraits, including a commission by the Bristol Masonic Society to replace the portrait of Alderman Sir Ernest Henry Cook, the Society’s very first President, which was originally painted by Ernest Board.

This new portrait was unveiled as part of the Society’s centenary celebrations.

Abraham Tolentino, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of the Philippines, headed a group of masons to visit Kennington Lodge, No. 1381, whose brethren are mostly Filipinos and which meets at Freemasons’ Hall, London

Also attending the meeting were Past Grand Master Tomas Rentoy III and Treasurer Greg Monreal, along with other Deputy District Grand Masters from various regions of the Philippines.

Devonshire Provincial Grand Master Ian Kingsbury handed a £500 cheque to John Austin, chairman of disability transport service Freedomwheels, in Cadogan Court, Exeter

The request for funding came from the Exeter & Topsham Masonic Widows Association, which relies heavily on Freedomwheels to enable their ladies to travel throughout the region and to their monthly meetings at the Royal Masonic Benevolent Institution care home.

An earlier cheque of £200 was presented to them by members of Exeter-based Davie Lodge, No. 3721.

The District Grand Lodge of Cyprus was proud to host the visit of the Pro Grand Master Peter Lowndes on 20th October 2017, where he had the opportunity to meet many members of the District, visit a local lodge and attend a Gala Dinner

It was a very important day for the District with plans for the visit having been started by the District Grand Secretary Robert Humphries several months in advance.

Together with his own Director of Ceremonies Charles Hopkinson-Woolley, the Pro Grand Master visited Apollo Lodge in the village of Episkopi where they were welcomed by the Worshipful Master Alan Cook. During his visit, he was also introduced to Gordon Rowell, an active member of the lodge at the ripe old age of 89.

In common with other visitors to the rather ancient Nissen hut which houses Apollo Lodge, the Pro Grand Master was astonished to see the attractive and well maintained interior of the building, including the beautifully laid out dining room. 

The Pro Grand Master learnt a great deal about Apollo Lodge and the District Grand Lodge of Cyprus. On completion of his visit, he was then presented with a framed print of an original painting by Brian Howard which depicted the Apollo Lodge building and the surrounding gardens.

The day continued with a business lunch with the District Grand Master Theodosios Theodossiou and District Grand Secretary Robert Humphries. The main event in the evening was a Gala Dinner Dance in the Panorama Room of the St Raphael Hotel, which was attended by 160 Freemasons and guests including the Grand Masters of the Grand Lodge of Cyprus and the Grand Lodge of Greece.

During the evening, the Pro Grand Master addressed the assembly and explained some of the highlights of the Masonic year including visits to other Districts in the Eastern Archipelago and Sri Lanka, where he had witnessed first-hand the charitable work that the Districts had been involved in. He also thanked the District Grand Master of Cyprus and the organisers of the visit.

After rousing applause, Theodosios Theodossiou thanked the Pro Grand Master on behalf of the District and presented a cheque for €10,000 to the Masonic Charitable Foundation – to which, in reply, the Pro Grand Master expressed his heartfelt thanks on behalf of the charity.

News that her organisation was going to be given £15,000 from the Masonic Charitable Foundation reduced Pat Ebbs to tears

“Words can’t explain what this means to us. No-one has even done anything like this for us before, and saying thank you just doesn’t seem to be enough,” she told Lincolnshire's Provincial Grand Master Graham Ives, when he went to Scunthorpe to make a formal presentation of the funds given to Magic Moments for Autisic Kids.

Pat is the driving force behind the charity, and knows better than most about life in families with autistic children – she has seven grandchildren suffering from it. 

The money is the largest single donation ever made to the group, which has the objective of preventing sufferers of autism from feeling isolated, of training them and giving them life experiences. 

Pat said the donation was a colossal sum of money and would make a significant difference to the families helped by the charity, which itself has been awarded an MBE. All of the money will be spent on providing experiences for the children, which will include a sledging trip and possibly a holiday in Wales at a venue specialising in holidays for disabled children.

Six Lincolnshire charities have benefited from Lincolnshire’s Community Awards after unprecedented public involvement. The Awards are a major part of Freemasonry’s 300th anniversary celebrations, with the Masonic Charitable Foundation distributing £3 million to 300 charities across the country.

All of the Lincolnshire charities were presented with their Awards by Graham Ives who commented: 'It was uplifting to hear the stories of the people who have been helped by these donations. Volunteers work so hard and to be able to provide the wherewithal for them to make an even more effective contribution is the perfect way to celebrate 300 years of Freemasonry. 

'We’ve been active in charity work for all of Freemasonry’s 300 years, but this is the first occasion we’ve asked the public to help us decide how to spend our money. We are very pleased that so many people from Lincolnshire took part in the vote.'

Port Talbot Masonic Lodges marked the Tercentenary of the United Grand Lodge of England by ‘adopting’ an ornamental garden in Margam Country Park and installing a commemorative monolith which was engraved with references to the 300th anniversary and Port Talbot Lodges

Future plans to further establish the Garden with the help and co-operation of Margam Country Park staff will include bilingual information boards and seating, along with the planting of flowers in the box hedge beds, to provide both the local community the facility to sit, quietly relax and reflect in a peaceful area, with the aim to be a lasting legacy for all.

The impressive monolith was donated by Michael Walton, an Officer of the Afan Lodge No. 833 in Port Talbot.

The Provincial Grand Master of South Wales Gareth Jones OBE unveiled the stone in the company of many masonic members and partners, including the Rev Edward Dowland-Owen, the Vicar of Margam Abbey, who blessed the Monument and Garden, as well as Leaders of the Neath Port Talbot Council Rob Jones and Neil Evans, the Estate Manager of Margam Country Park Michael Wynne and Head Gardener Jeannette Dunk.

It was also particularly fitting that the stone be laid within the Park and Margam Castle, which was formerly the home of the Talbot family, who assisted with the cost of the impressive Port Talbot Masonic Hall and generously enabled Masonic progress in the town.

Clocking up the miles in the name of charity

For most 86-year-olds, taking it easy might be par for the course, but for Yorkshire Freemason Jeffrey Long MBE, a veteran paratrooper and serial fundraiser, it’s a different story

Jeffrey has been a busy man in 2017, as a chance encounter with a stranger called Paula Modeste at Windsor train station saw his latest adventure of walking 86 miles go viral, with a ‘selfie’ photograph grabbing the attention of comedian Jason Manford and helping his fundraising for the Royal British Legion go beyond the £120,000 mark – not bad considering his original target was to reach £1,000.

Alongside interviews with the BBC and ITV, national newspapers have also helped Jeffrey gather plenty of deserved headlines as he clocked up the miles. Jason Manford even drove down to Jeffrey’s hometown of Bingley, West Yorkshire, to meet him, whilst he was invited by Chelsea Football Club to be a special guest and introduced on the pitch before their match against Manchester United on 5th November.

Following walks of 84 and 85 miles the previous two years to coincide with his age at the time, Jeffrey’s latest venture of 86 miles saw him start out at the Thames Barrier and eight days later finish in the dark in Caversham, Reading. He estimates that the time spent walking 86 miles took him a full five days to complete, as along the way he also celebrated his 86th birthday with a meal on the 32nd floor of the Shard and visited the Embassy of Switzerland to meet their Ambassador Alexandre Fasel and Guildhall to meet Chief Commoner Wendy Mead.

Jeffrey, who is on chemo treatment because his body is producing too many platelets, admits that his latest walk was not without its challenges. He said: ‘I also suffered a problem with my hamstring a few months before and by the time I started the walk, it had still not recovered. I didn’t have too much of a problem walking as long as I didn’t stride out, but when it came to going down steps, it really pulled on my hamstring and hurt like mad.

‘I loved the challenge of walking 86 miles and even though many people have said it’s extraordinary to be completing it at my age, it doesn’t really seem extraordinary to me.

‘The truth is that I’ve never really been much of a social walker. I don’t have time to train, so when it came to first preparing for these challenges, I just remember putting on some boots, walking for around an hour outside and then going ‘I’ll be fine!’

So how do you go about topping an 86 mile walk? Simple – Jeffrey is already looking ahead to the challenge of walking 87 miles next year. Not only that, he’s considering walking another 100 miles for a separate challenge and looking for a sponsor as he considers swapping the walking boots for a bike and cycling from London to Paris!

Jeffrey is also fundraising for the Parachute Regiment’s charity, Support Our Paras, and to donate please click here.

Jeffrey Long was featured in the Summer 2017 of Freemasonry Today – read his interview here.

Published in More News

Freemasons from Leicestershire and Rutland, who cycled 300 miles during the summer, made their last short trip from Leicester to Loughborough to present a cheque for £11,704 to Rainbows Children’s Hospice in Loughborough

In June 2017, 23 Freemasons cycled around the Masonic centres in Leicestershire and Rutland and down to Freemasons’ Hall in London and back – completing a total of 300 miles as part of their 300th anniversary celebrations.

A total of £23,408 was raised from Freemasons, family and friends which was split equally between Rainbows and the Masonic Charitable Foundation.

A number of the cyclists took the short ride to Rainbows Hospice at Lark Rise in Loughborough to present the cheque to David Strudley, Rainbows CEO. The Provincial Grand Master of Leicestershire and Rutland David Hagger was also on hand to formally present the cheque.

After light refreshments, the cyclists were delighted to have a guided tour of the Hospice and hear first-hand about the amazing care and support provided by Rainbows for life-limited children and their families.

Simon Oldfield, who organised the ride, said: ‘Riding 300 miles in four days was a first for many of us. After seeing the excellent work that Rainbows do, it makes me very proud to be a Freemason and to have been part of the team to help raise funds for such an amazing charity.

‘We all felt very humbled and everyone who took part in the ride, the cyclists and support team, felt immensely proud of our fundraising achievement and the opportunity to support such a deserving local charity. It made all the hard work of training through the depths of winter so very worthwhile.’

David Strudley, Rainbows CEO, commented: ‘We are especially grateful to Leicestershire and Rutland Freemasons in making Rainbows Hospice part of their 300th anniversary fundraising event. The magnificent total raised from their cycling marathon will go a long way to supporting youngsters with life-limiting conditions and their families when they need it most.’

Provincial Grand Master David Hagger added: ‘I most sincerely thank the cyclists and assisting crew on behalf of all the Freemasons and their families in Leicestershire and Rutland for the generous contribution they have made – it is truly a magnificent achievement.’

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