A very large tea party

On 16 March, residents and staff at 12 RMBI care homes joined in an attempt to break the record for the world’s largest multi-site tea party

RMBI Marketing and Communications Officer Maricel Foronda said: ‘We were very excited to be involved in this record-breaking attempt. RMBI homes are located throughout England and Wales, and this has brought people together and made them feel part of something bigger.’ 

The event was organised by catering company WhiteOaks. The current record is held by the Yorkshire Building Society, involving 667 people across six UK locations in June 2015.

Published in RMBI

Making a visible difference

As the four main masonic charities combine to form the Masonic Charitable Foundation, we have published four new infographics to celebrate their work.

They give a quick historical overview of each charity, as well as explaining some of the real differences they have made through their charitable support.

These can be seen on the Charitable Works page of the UGLE site.

Published in Freemasonry Cares

Quarterly Communication of Grand Lodge

9 March 2016

The minutes of the Quarterly Communication of 9 December 2015 were approved.

HRH The Duke of Kent was unanimously re-elected Grand Master.

Report of the Board of General Purposes

Grand Lodge Register 2006-2015

Register - Mar 2016


Charges for Warrants

The Board recommended that for the year commencing 1 April 2016 the charges (exclusive of VAT) shall be: Warrant for a new lodge £375; Warrant of Confirmation £980; Warrant for a Centenary Jewel £575; Warrant of Confirmation for a Centenary Jewel £835; Warrant for a Bi-Centenary Bar £885; Warrant of Confirmation for a Bi-Centenary Bar £885; Certificate of Amalgamation £100; Enfacement (Alterations) Fee £135.

Amalgamations

The Board had received a report that Woodend Lodge No. 5302 had surrendered its warrant and wished to amalgamate with Liverpool Epworth Lodge No. 5381 (West Lancashire). A resolution from the Board that the lodge be removed from the register in order to amalgamate was approved. 

Erasure of Lodges

The Board had received a report that the following 12 lodges had closed and surrendered their warrants: Baildon Lodge No. 1545 (Yorkshire, West Riding), Regent Lodge No. 2856 (Yorkshire, West Riding), Summum Bonum Lodge No. 3665 (Middlesex), Fortitude Lodge No. 4017 (Northumberland), Kinder Scout Lodge No. 4532 (Derbyshire), Opthalmos Lodge No. 4633 (London), Court Mead Lodge No. 4669 (London), Loyalty United Lodge No. 4931 (London), Amicitia Lodge No. 5114 (Middlesex), Aberconwy Lodge No. 5996 (North Wales), Kenyngton Manor Lodge No. 7488 (Middlesex) and United Fairway Lodge No. 9094 (Essex).

Expulsions from the Craft

Eleven brethren were expelled from the Craft on 30 August 2015.

New Lodges

The following is a list for which new warrants have been granted and the dates from which their warrants became effective:

11 November 2015

Music Lodge No. 9919 (South Wales)
Hoose Lodge No. 9920 (Cheshire)
Football Lodge No. 9921 (Hampshire & Isle of Wight)
Spirit of Rugby Lodge No. 9922 (East Kent)
Keystone Centenary Lodge No. 9923 (Nigeria)
Udokanma Lodge No. 9924 (Nigeria). 

The Masonic Charitable Foundation

Brig David Innes, CEO of the Masonic Charitable Foundation and James Newman, President of the Royal Masonic Benevolent Institution gave a talk. 

Meetings of the Quarterly Communication of Grand Lodge

Meetings will be held on 27 April 2016 (Annual Investiture), 8 June 2016, 14 September 2016, 14 December 2016, 8 March 2017 and 14 June 2017.

Convocations of Supreme Grand Chapter

Meetings will be held on 28 April 2016, 9 November 2016 and 27 April 2017. 

Published in UGLE

Stronger voice

Chief Executive of the Masonic Charitable Foundation David Innes explains how he intends to use the leadership and operational expertise he gained in the military to take the new charity forward

What did you do before entering the charity sector?

I joined the army after finishing my A levels in 1971, which was the start of a 34-year career that saw me rise through the ranks and end up a Brigadier and Engineer-in-Chief. During that time my career had two main elements – the first was regimental duty, using leadership, man management and operational planning skills. The other half was in office jobs ranging from strategy, intelligence and budgets through to training, human resources and change management jobs. Consequently, I ended up with a broad spectrum of abilities in a number of areas.

What drew you to the charity sector?

Growing up, I’d been in the Cubs, the Scouts and the Pony Club, so I was aware of charitable activities from an early age, but had little chance to volunteer myself. I left the army in 2005 when I was 51, but didn’t feel it was time to retire and wanted to have a second career. The military sector is all about people and the motto from Sandhurst is ‘Serve to Lead’. You are under intense pressure to deliver on the tasks you’re given but you need to look after the people, otherwise you can’t deliver those outputs. 

I thought it was a chance for me to use the experience I’d gained and put that back into the charity world. 

What was your first charity position?

I headed up the fundraising at Canterbury Cathedral, which was very interesting. It’s been around for many hundreds of years but has only occasionally had to fundraise. We set up a new campaign, which required working with the Charity Commission and charity lawyers. It was a great start for me in the charity world but it wasn’t utilising all my leadership skills. I was approached to put my hat in the ring for Chief Executive at the Royal Masonic Benevolent Institution (RMBI) and was successful.

How did the RMBI compare with Canterbury Cathedral?

I started with the RMBI in 2008 and it was very different from Canterbury. It was about delivering an operational output and I realised there were huge parallels between delivering military operations and care operations. 

We look after 1,100 people in our care homes and we need to make sure each one of them is given the best possible care. There are 1,500 people employed in the RMBI, which is the size of a very large regiment in the military, so it’s about harnessing those skills, getting the right people in the right place at the right time with the right equipment, training and motivation, and operating as a team. 

How has the RMBI changed over the past eight years?

The RMBI has had to adapt to social and economic pressures. When I arrived, the vast majority of our residents were active and mobile, and many had been with us for five, 10 or even 20 years. Today, the residential sector has shifted to high-dependency and end-of-life dementia care. Residents stay for a much shorter time and their requirements are more demanding. Therefore, the number of staff we need is higher and the unit cost of care has gone up, but local authority or NHS funding has not matched it, so the economic challenges have been very significant. We’ve had to find a lot of efficiencies, which has proved intellectually stimulating as well as rewarding. 

Is the Masonic Charitable Foundation going to operate differently?

In the RMBI, I insist that everyone speaks about the residents first, the staff second, the relatives third and everyone else fourth. That way the primary focus is on the residents. Similarly, with the Masonic Charitable Foundation (MCF) I will encourage people to talk about our beneficiaries first because looking after them is the single most important thing we will do.

By bringing the four charities together we are improving the service by providing a single point of contact and a single process. Whether it’s advice or financial grants, we’re trying to make support easier to access. We are also providing increasing support to the masonic community – to Provincial Grand Almoners and Provincial Grand Charity Stewards. I’d like to see that strengthened as a result of being a single organisation.

Will the MCF have more of a voice?

When we bring all the charities together, we will be a sizeable organisation in the UK charity sector and, as such, we should be recognised. We should be a voice contributing to the third sector in giving our point of view. The masonic community has not been well represented because it has comprised many small elements. One of the things that I hope the MCF will do is bring them together and be a strong voice in an important sector.

‘We have more than 400 years of history and that will be the foundation for the MCF.’

What challenges do you face as a charity with a membership organisation behind it?

There are very few charities that operate across quite such a broad spectrum. Many tend to focus on one area, whereas we provide whole-life support to the masonic community, at whatever age the help is needed. That’s one of our strengths, but we also have to be mindful that, as our funds come from the masonic community, we spend those funds on causes that the community supports. 

How is the MCF affected by the need to recruit and retain more masons?

By the end of this decade, 50 per cent of Freemasons will be over 70. Clearly those masons will be relying on their pensions and savings, so we need to be mindful that income to the charities may well go down. We must look for efficiencies wherever we can, to get as much as we can out of every penny. 

I do believe, however, that by working with UGLE in supporting its future strategy for Freemasonry, we will be able to stem the decline in membership.

What is planned for the MCF?

Between the four charities, we have more than 400 years of history and that will be the foundation for the MCF. There is a lot of work to do and the integration will have an impact on staff. That will take a bit of time so I’ve allocated 2016 to getting us fully operational in our new organisation. 

As 2017 is the Tercentenary year, our focus will be on supporting a huge number of exciting initiatives. In 2018-19 I’m looking to start growing the MCF, to provide services where we currently don’t and to reach out to more beneficiaries. We need to build our brand, and our single name will make it easier to get that out into the community. The MCF has an exciting future and I feel hugely privileged to have been selected to lead it during these early years.

Highest French honour

Two Freemasons, Ray Worrall, a resident at RMBI care home Connaught Court in York, and Bill Doherty from Northumberland, have both been awarded the Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur – the highest decoration in France – by the French Consul. 

Ray’s book Escape from France tells the story of how his Lancaster bomber was shot down over occupied France in 1944. Ray was hidden in the Fréteval forest by the French Resistance, who helped him return to England. Bill received the award for helping to liberate the first French village, Ranville, during the Normandy D-Day landings.

Published in RMBI

East Lancashire festival triumph

East Lancashire masons held an end-of-Festival banquet at Bolton Wanderers’ Macron Stadium to celebrate raising more than £2.6 million for the RMBI. Pro Grand Master Peter Lowndes and Bolton’s mayor, Cllr Carole Swarbrick, attended.

PGM Sir David Trippier said that despite one of the worst economic depressions since the war, which had hit the region hard, the amount raised per capita was much higher than during the previous Festival. Entertainment on the night was provided by the Opera Boys, guitarist Neil Smith and the band of the Lancashire Fusiliers.

Completely at home

Last year, 96 per cent of residents said they were happy living in an RMBI care home – a statistic echoed by 93 per cent of relatives. 

At the RMBI, care is provided for older Freemasons and their families as well as some people in the community. Caring has been RMBI’s way of life since 1842 and it provides a home for over 1,000 people across England and Wales – while supporting many more. Whether people need residential or nursing care, specialist dementia support or day services, the RMBI cares for them professionally and kindly.

Those members of the masonic community who choose an RMBI care home have the security of knowing that they have a home for life as long as it is possible to support their needs. This applies even if their financial circumstances change.

Published in RMBI

Festive appeals total tops £8m

The closing months of 2015 saw the conclusion of two successful Festival Appeals from Bedfordshire and East Lancashire Freemasons. Both Provinces held special events to celebrate raising more than £1.5 million for the RMTGB and over £2.5 million for the RMBI, respectively. 

Pro Grand Master Peter Lowndes attended both events along with the Presidents and Chief Executives of the charities, Mike Woodcock and Les Hutchinson for the RMTGB, and James Newman and David Innes for the RMBI.

The funds raised by Bedfordshire and East Lancashire bring the total raised for the central masonic charities through 2015 Festival Appeals to a staggering £8.2 million.

Published in Freemasonry Cares

The 50th anniversary meeting of Falcon Lodge No. 8062 took place on Monday, 8th February 2016 at Freemasons' Hall

W Bro Paul Norton, PAGDC, a Founder of the lodge, was installed as Worshipful Master and W Bro Philip Belchak, PGStB, the only other living founder and an honorary member acted as Senior Warden for the meeting. Honorary members, Assistant Metropolitan Grand Master VW Bro David Wilkinson, PGSwdB, and VW Bro David Taylor, PGSuptWks, attended the meeting which was officiated by Metropolitan Grand Inspector VW Bro Stratton Richey.

The lodge presented a donation to the MMC Air Ambulance Appeal for £5,000 which was gratefully accepted by Bro Richey on behalf of Metropolitan Grand Lodge. The lodge, already a Grand Patron of the RMBI, presented a further donation of £500 to VW Bro James Newman, President of the RMBI, who was also in attendance.

A lecture on the history of the lodge, written by the Lodge Mentor, W Bro Neil Mills, PAGPurs, was delivered by a new Master Mason in the lodge. The history highlighted the lodge's origination from the 'Arts and Circles' Class of Instruction held on Sunday mornings at the Albion, Ludgate Circus which provided a school of instruction for members of the theatrical profession whose only free day was a Sunday.

Following the lecture, Bro Richey presented two Grand Lodge certificates to new members after which Assistant Metropolitan Grand Master VW Bro Stephen Fenton, PGSwdB, presented a letter of congratulations, signed by the Metropolitan Grand Master RW Bro Sir Michael Snyder, to the Worshipful Master.

More than 100 members and their guests dined afterwards at the Grand Connaught Rooms. All attending received a pair of white masonic gloves, suitably inscribed, as a gift.

Chief Executive and Chief Operating Officer of Masonic Charitable Foundation announced

In his speech at today's Quarterly Communication of Grand Lodge, the Pro Grand Master Peter Lowndes confirmed the appointments of first Chief Executive and Chief Operating Officer for the newly formed MCF.

Peter Lowndes: David Innes of the RMBI has been selected as the Foundation’s first Chief Executive and Les Hutchinson of the RMTGB has been appointed Chief Operating Officer. They have a wealth of experience and knowledge about masonic charity and are well placed to lead the Foundation. I believe it is important to note that they faced strong competition for these jobs from outside the masonic charities.

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