On Tuesday 13th January, Grand Superintendent Peter Kinder, together with his Provincial Team, visited Temperantia Chapter No. 4088 to mark the occasion of Michael Edward Herbert's 50th anniversary as a member of the Royal Arch

After witnessing an excellent ceremony, when W Bro Simon Baigent was exalted into Royal Arch Masonry, E Comp Peter Kinder presented a certificate to Michael in recognition of his 50 years in the Royal Arch.

Before making the presentation, Peter read from a 'Big Red Book' entitled 'This is your Masonic Life'. It was impossible for Peter to mention everything in the book as Michael is active in virtually every degree in Freemasonry and has, indeed, been the head of orders both Provincially and nationally.

The evening was concluded with an excellent Festive Board when over 60 companions dined and the chapter presented Michael with a gift to mark this wonderful occasion.

Members the Leicestershire and Rutland Light Blue Club started 2015 off as they mean to go on when on Friday 9th January, a dozen brethren from eight different lodges in the Province (including VW Bro Peter Kinder, APGM, and W Bro Richard Jelly, ProvSGW) visited The Grand Master's Lodge in Dublin, Ireland

The Grand Master’s Lodge is one of the oldest lodges in the Irish Constitution and celebrated its 250th anniversary in 1999. The lodge initiates candidates and carries out all the routine business of a Lodge, but due to its unique history, it has a number of traditions, rights and privileges which stem from its origins in the 18th century.

Prior to the meeting, the visiting brethren were treated to a private tour of Freemasons’ Hall by the Grand Tyler of Ireland. The hall was completed in 1869 and has been the home of Irish Freemasonry ever since. Not only does it contain a number of lodge rooms, but also a specially built room for meetings of the Royal Arch, Knights Templar and Rose Croix, as well as an interesting library and museum.

Highlights included the Chapter room decorated in an Egyptian style with a trap door designed to lower individuals down into another room beneath the floor during the ceremony, an ornately designed chapel-like preceptory room complete with a stunning stained glass window, and the Prince Masons room (Rose Croix) which was adorned with beautifully crafted wooden chairs, coats of arms and banners.

The Light Blue Club were lucky enough to be visiting when the Grand Master of Ireland, Most Worshipful Douglas Grey, was attending his own Lodge for the first time in his current capacity having been Installed as Grand Master a few months earlier after previously holding the office of Deputy Grand Master.

In addition to the Grand Master being the Master of his own lodge, the Wardens, Treasurer and Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Ireland also hold their respective positions within the lodge. In the absence of these Brethren there are appointment permanent acting officers, and therefore the Installation ceremony witnessed was that for the Right Worshipful Acting Master, in this case the RW is applied to the office rather than the individual, and his officers.

The ritual was of impeccable standard and carried out superbly and in good humour by members of the Lodge, assisted by Light Blue Club attendees RW Bro Peter Kinder and W Bro Daniel Hayward who were honoured to be asked to undertake the roles of Senior Warden and Inner Guard respectively within the Inner Workings. The ceremony offered a fascinating insight into the differences between our own ritual and that practiced in Ireland, and was enjoyed by all the visitors present.

Following the Installation, the brethren had a chance to meet the Grand Master of Ireland before the Festive Board, where they once again learned about and enjoyed the differences in approach practiced by our Irish brethren. The Grand Master offered his fraternal greetings and welcomed the Light Blue Club to Dublin, whilst also being very impressed that brother Luke Smith was visiting just weeks after being initiated into the Craft.

RW Bro Peter Kinder responded to the toast on behalf of the visitors, with a speech laced with good humour and fellowship, thanking the Grand Master for the superb hospitality provided by the lodge. The festivities continued after dinner, as the Brethren of Grand Masters’ Lodge hosted the LBC until the small hours.

A truly memorable time was had by all, especially those brethren for which this had been their very first visit to any lodge at home or abroad. The question on everyone’s lips was 'Where is next?!'

Published in International

The Wyggeston Lodge No. 3448, which is the Universities’ Scheme lodge for the University of Leicester, welcomed another five new members at their Christmas meeting on 19th December 2014 held at Freemasons' Hall, Leicester

These five new members take a very special place in the history of Wyggeston Lodge, being part of an ever growing number of young Freemasons to have joined since 2011 when the lodge joined the Universities’ Scheme

Three of the members are either undergraduate or postgraduate students at the University of Leicester whilst the others work and live locally. The Lodge now has 47 members in total, with an age range between 21 and 90 and an average age of 45.

The festivities continued at the festive board where the lodge members and visitors, including the Leicestershire and Rutland Light Blue Club, enjoyed a traditional Christmas dinner with an interjection of rousing christmas carols and songs including 12 Days of Christmas and Good King Wenceslas.

Through the generosity of those at the meeting, over £240 was raised for LOROS Hospice, a local charity that cares for over 2,500 people across Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland, and the Derbyshire, Leicestershire and Rutland Air Ambulance.

Remembering the Alamo

Andy Green, Provincial Communication Officer for Leicestershire and Rutland, recently attended a special meeting of Alamo Lodge, No. 44, San Antonio, Texas, which was held in the Alamo Chapel. The lodge was founded in the historic Alamo complex, known as the ‘Shrine of Texas Liberty’. It was granted a charter from the Grand Lodge of Texas in January 1848 and a plaque on the south wall of the Long Barrack of the Alamo celebrates this. 

The Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Texas, Michael Wiggins, paid tribute to the masons who lost their lives in the assault on the Alamo by Mexican General Antonio López de Santa Anna on 6 March 1836. They included Jim Bowie, Davy Crockett, James Bonham, Almaron Dickinson and William Travis. 

Published in International

On Tuesday 11th November 2014, the Castle of Leicester Lodge No. 7767 undertook an historic sextuple initiation ceremony at Freemason’s Hall, Leicester

This was the first time in the lodge’s history that six candidates were initiated in the same ceremony.

In his final meeting as master, W Bro Bryan Weston was in the Chair for the third initiation ceremony of his year in office, having now initiated 13 men into Freemasonry since February 2014.

A multiple ceremony was once again order of the day as Castle of Leicester Lodge has seen a steady influx of candidates since becoming the Universities' Scheme lodge for De Montfort University (DMU) in January 2013. Indeed, this ceremony came just 11 days after the lodge conducted a quintuple passing in the Leicestershire and Rutland Lodge of Installed Masters No. 7896.

The Lodge continues to attract candidates from a wide variety of backgrounds, and on this unique occasion the initiates included students, businessmen, and the retired, all having been attracted to join the Craft either via existing friends in the lodge or after learning more via its social media presence.

The meeting was well supported with 48 in attendance, a dozen of which were guests, including a student member from the Grand Orient of Brazil, who having arrived to study at DMU in September, completed his application on the very same evening in order that he may become a joining member and continue his masonic journey with the United Grand Lodge of England.

Published in Universities Scheme

On Tuesday 2nd December 2014, RW Bro David Hagger, Provincial Grand Master for Leicestershire and Rutland, attended the meeting of Lodge of Friendship No. 7168 at Freemasons’ Hall, Leicester, along with his Provincial Officers, to present RW Bro Michael Roalfe with a 50 year certificate of continuous and dedicated service to Freemasonry

RW Bro Michael was initiated into the Lodge of Friendship No. 7168 on the 1st December 1965 and was installed 15 years later into the Master's Chair in 1979. He joined the Leicestershire and Rutland Lodge of Installed Masters No. 7896 and became its Master in 1999 and is also a member of Reynard Lodge No. 9285, the Three Counties Lodge No. 9278 (Province of Northamptonshire and Huntingdonshire) and an Honorary member of 8 other Craft lodges.

RW Bro Michael was installed as Provincial Grand Master of Leicestershire and Rutland in 2002 and remained in Office for 8 years until 2010. He attained Grand Rank of Past Grand Sword Bearer in 2000.

Within the Royal Arch, RW Bro Michael was exalted into Chapter of Welcome No. 5664 in 1982, was a Founder Member of Uppingham in Rutland Chapter No. 9119 and is also a member of the Gateway Chapter No. 6513. He was Third Provincial Grand Principal of Leicestershire and Rutland in 1991 and has since received Grand Rank of PGScribeE in 2002. He further holds Grand Rank in 10 other masonic degrees.

During the presentation, the Provincial Grand Master referred to RW Bro Michael's 'glittering career in Freemasonry and wished him many more happy years', to which he responded that he had enjoyed every moment of his masonry and gave heartfelt thanks to the Provincial team, visitors, his personal guests and to the members of the Lodge of Friendship, which amounted to over 100 in total, for attending and supporting him on this special occasion.

Leicester's War Memorial

On the north side of the Holmes Lodge Room in Leicester's Freemasons’ Hall stands a war memorial tablet which details the names of the brethren who served in the Great War (WW1), and the seven Leicestershire and Rutland brethren who gave their lives in that conflict. Often the brethren attending meetings in that fine space give it scarcely a second glance, but how did it come to be there and what can we find out about those seven brethren?

An appeal was launched in 1919 for subscriptions towards a Freemasons’ War Memorial which 'should take the form of a substantial fund for the Leicester Royal Infirmary (LRI) and a memorial of some kind in connection with the Masonic Temple'.

The appeal raised over £5,500 (equivalent to £750,000 in today's money) of which £5,000 was for the LRI (new Orthopaedic Department) and the remainder for a memorial tablet to record the names of the seven brethren who fell in the war, plus those brethren who served in His Majesty’s Regular and Territorial Forces.

A question has been raised whether there are other Leicestershire and Rutland masons who died in action or as a result of wounds, who are missing from the memorial. The problem is that many of the records were bombed in the Second World War – many being totally destroyed and what remains at Kew are referred to as 'the burnt records'.

So next time you are in Freemasons’ Hall, please do go into the Holmes Lodge Room and look at the memorial tablet, and spare a thought for those brethren in general who served their country 100 years ago.

A detailed paper has been written about the tablet in the Holmes Lodge Room (with detailed notes on the seven brethren) by W Bro Jonathan Varley and has been published in the 2012-13 Transactions of the Lodge of Research No. 2429, which are available from the lodge secretary.

The Lodge of Research seeks to exchange opinions with Freemasons throughout the world, and to attract and interest brethren by means of papers on the historical and symbolic aspects of masonry. It meets on the fourth Monday in November, January and March at London Road. Contact the secretary for further details of membership or visiting.

 Symposium for UGLE  bicentenary

Lodge of Research, No. 2429, in the Province of Leicestershire & Rutland, has marked the 200th anniversary of the formation of the United Grand Lodge of England by organising a symposium and dinner at one of its regular meetings. 

There were both masonic and non-masonic visitors, including the then Assistant Grand Master David Williamson and Provincial Grand Master David Hagger, who heard a number of papers delivered by prominent masonic historians, including Professor Andrew Prescott. Among other guests was Philippa Faulks, publishing manager at Lewis Masonic, which sponsored the event.

More than  fair

The Showmen’s Lodge has been bringing together fairground rides, local communities and Freemasonry since it was consecrated in 2007. Ellie Fazan meets the members and spends a day on the dodgems.

For the fairground showmen on Keyworth Playing Fields, Nottingham, it’s an early start – so early, the sun hasn’t yet burnt the summer haze from the sky. ‘We’re never ready until the first members of the public arrive,’ the guys laugh as they put the finishing touches to the rides and attractions at Keyworth Fair, opening this afternoon. There’s something heart-warming about watching a big man artfully arranging popcorn and kids’ toys as prizes on a stand.

‘We closed the last fair at 7pm on Sunday night then packed up and drove through the night to get here. It’s amazing what you get used to,’ explains David Cox Jr (otherwise known as ‘Little David’). ‘Even though I’ve been doing this my whole life, there’s always a thrill arriving somewhere new. This is a real feel-good job. There’s nothing quite like it when there’s sun on your back and cash in your pocket.’

Being a showman is hereditary; rides and pitches run in the family. Little David is the fifth generation. His dad, David Cox Sr, who organised this fair, gave him the waltzers when he was seventeen. David Sr is also one of the founding members of the Showmen’s Lodge, No. 9826, along with the other men at Keyworth today. ‘We were in another lodge that gradually dissolved,’ explains David Sr, ‘and we wanted to be members of something again. We decided on Loughborough as a location because it’s motorway connected, and we have to be mindful of where people travel.’

A sense of belonging

It might seem a strange leap from the fairground to Freemasonry, but the ties are strong. ‘While numbers in some lodges decline, special-interest lodges like this one are growing because of that extra layer of binding,’ explains Leicestershire and Rutland Provincial Grand Master David Hagger, who consecrated the lodge.

‘Even though I’ve been doing this my whole life, there’s always a thrill arriving somewhere new. This is a real feel-good job. There’s nothing quite like it when there’s sun on your back and cash in your pocket.’ David Cox Jr

With showmen only bedding down in one place for three or four months over winter, the sense of community that Freemasonry brings is crucial. ‘We travel widely so it’s good to have something extra that connects us. This gives us a chance to get together and see friends we might not otherwise see,’ says Philip Wheatley, the Worshipful Master. ‘It’s a great social life, and we get to talk about the things that affect our business.’ His brother Jimmy continues: ‘We always meet in November near the Loughborough Fair, because it’s one of the big ones on the calendar that we all go to. The Festive Board is spectacular.’

The Showmen’s Lodge has brethren from all over the country, with members coming from twelve different Provinces as far away as Bradford and Kent. ‘And they have a very close relationship with one another. The son of a mason is called a Lewis, and in this Order there are many more Lewises than usual. Nine fathers and sons, and several brothers and cousins too,’ explains David Hagger.

Another founding member, Michael McKean is here with his son Clark, who has ‘been friends since the word go’ with Little David. As have their parents – and grandparents. Family ties here are strong, and it’s a very close community. ‘Weddings and funerals are huge,’ explains Clark, ‘and the lifestyle is great: going to different places, having great friends and really good family. I’m thirty-three and I’m with my father ninety per cent of the time, always helping each other out. You can’t say that in many communities these days. I have a little girl who is one and a half and she is with us most of the time. It makes life easy, and means showmen don’t have trouble with their kids.’

On home ground 

When it comes to stories that have grown up about fairgrounds, the men are keen to dispel certain myths. Contrary to popular belief, their fair has an excellent safety record: ‘Better than Transport for London,’ says Michael. ‘And public preconceptions about us are wrong. They think we go round ripping people off. Not all gypsies are like that, and nor are we. I understand that people are wary of us – they wake up one morning and we’re here. That’s disconcerting.’

On the whole, however, the showmen have a good relationship with the local community and are proud to be welcomed back by those who have got to know them in previous years. ‘My ride is the tea cups,’ says Philip, ‘and some years mothers will come up to me nodding at their children and say, “He’s a bit too big for it now,” and smile. That gives me real pleasure. You don’t love a ride because of how big it is, but because of the pleasure it gives.’

Like many others in the UK, the showmen have been bitten by the economic recession, with the cost of fuel also a big problem. ‘It used to be that you’d only do a six-mile radius, then in recent years we’ve been going all over, and now the net is closing in again. It’s a fine balancing act, to work out the costs. It’s £5,000 for a full tank of petrol to London and back,’ says David Sr. ‘So you have to be sure you’ll make it back.’ And these days people have less to spend. Many come to the fair just to soak up the atmosphere but there’s no bitterness on the part of the showmen: ‘That’s part of the service too. The beauty of the thing is you can come and spend as much or as little as you like.’

‘We want to help the public through any predicament they may be in, whether that is by providing entertainment or charity.’ Michael McKean

‘I’m thirty-three and I’m with my father ninety per cent of the time, always helping each other out. You can’t say that in many communities these days.’ Clark McKean

The fun of the fair

The economic troubles haven’t stopped the lodge’s charitable intentions. Providing spectacle for all, the Showmen’s Lodge is guided by a philosophy of giving back to the communities that give to them. ‘At the consecration meeting they raised £1,400, which shows their generosity,’ says David Hagger.

Recently, Michael ran a free fair for children with additional needs in Derbyshire on the care in the community day. ‘Jimmy asked me and I said yes. Simple as that. And there was no trouble getting others to take part. Just the looks on the little kids’ faces made it worthwhile,’ he says. ‘But this isn’t just because we’re Freemasons. In the showmen community there is a strong tradition of charity.’

Famous showman Pat Collins, Showmen’s Guild president from 1920 to 1929, ran free fairs for orphans of the time. ‘We want to help the public through any predicament they may be in, whether that is by providing entertainment or charity,’ Michael says. ‘During World War I, we provided ambulances to take the wounded from the front, and during World War II showmen all chipped in and bought a Spitfire, known as “The Fun of the Fair”.’ Within their community they have raised more than £100,000 through Molliefest, a fair held to support a sick child.

As the day wound down, conversation moved from charity work to lifestyle. So what’s it like living in a caravan? ‘Same as living in a house. We have every luxury you can imagine,’ says David Sr. Do you ever go to the fair when you’re on holiday? Laughter from Clark, ‘I’ve been to Puerto Rico and seen fairs you wouldn’t want to stand next to, never mind ride on.’

Is it dangerous? ‘How many scars do you want to see?’ laughs Little David. Followed quickly by: ‘No! We are brought up knowing how to look after our equipment. We can spot trouble a country mile off and look out for each other.’ There is no doubt that these men are genuinely committed to each other and the communities they visit.

Then I ask the question that’s been on the tip of my tongue all day: ‘What’s your favourite ride?’ Little David replies immediately: ‘The waltzer. We have a saying: you can take the boy out of the waltzer, but you can’t take the waltzer out of the boy.’ David Jr’s dad chips in with less sentiment: ‘I like whatever ride takes the most money. If someone says to me, can you get such and such, the answer is always yes. Because even if I can’t get it, I know a man who can. We’ve got any event covered.’

Letters to the editor - No. 24 Winter 2013

More than fair

Sir,

I should like, through Freemasonry Today, to thank the owners of the dodgems featured in the article ‘More Than Fair’ in the last issue. The reason for my thanks is that my brother-in-law, Philip Mosley, was physically and mentally handicapped and used to love the fair coming to Buxton. He would get very excited when he saw it. The dodgems was his favourite ride and they allowed him to go on it at any time without paying. 

After I married my wife, Philip lived with us because of his parents’ death. This thank you has been a long time in coming – Philip passed on in 1987 – but I hope it’s better late than never. He must have enjoyed those dodgems for about forty-five years, some of that before my time.

On behalf of my wife Brenda and the Mosley family I thank the owners of that dodgems ride and wish that they prosper long. Thank you also for your interesting magazine, which I pass along as far as Malta.

David Storer, High Peak Lodge, No. 1952, Buxton, Derbyshire

 

 

A good catch

Members of Flyfishers’ Lodge, No. 9347, and Saint Oswald Lodge, No. 850, from Ashbourne in Derbyshire, used their annual competition to launch a wheelyboat for disabled anglers. The funding was raised by both Derbyshire and Leicestershire masons, along with the Peter Harrison Foundation and Derbyshire Community Foundation. The boat was launched by Derbyshire Provincial Grand Master Graham Rudd. Ben Hodgson, principal of Carsington Sports & Leisure, said: ‘We’d like to thank the Freemasons. They expected a five-year campaign, but achieved their target in 12 months.’

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