Celebrating 300 years

New advert for Cadbury Dairy Milk features our very own Freemasons' Hall in a supporting role!

In the video, which was directed by Ben Winston, comedian James Corden lip-syncs to Estelle's Free. 

Arian Jessop from Ayton Lodge No 9595 has walked to Freemasons’ Hall in London from York, fundraising over £1,300 for his Province’s current Masonic Samaritan Fund (MSF) Festival Appeal

Covering 245 miles over 14 days, Adrian updated a daily blog and shared pictures of his journey online with masons from the Province of Yorkshire, North and East Ridings. He said: 'Now I have completed the walk, I feel absolutely elated. I have been bowled over by the support from my family, colleagues and friends, both masons and non-masons.'

'None of us know if or when we may need to call on help, suffer an illness or disability where treatment is limited or not available. This was my way of supporting a fantastic charity achieving great things by helping others. I have many lasting memories from this walk and I met many new friends along the way. Thank you to all that have followed my progress and supported me through sponsorship.'

Willie Shackell, President of the MSF said: 'Having watched his progress with great interest, we were delighted to welcome Adrian to the MSF’s office and offer our sincere thanks for his incredible effort on our behalf.'

Published in Masonic Samaritan Fund
Monday, 11 November 2013 13:31

Freemasons mark Remembrance Day

If you have any photos from Remembrance Day you'd like us to share, please tweet them to us @UGLE_GrandLodge, or post them to our Facebook page

 

 

 

Published in More News
Thursday, 05 September 2013 01:00

John Vazquez is the Mr Fix-It of Freemasons' Hall

Behind the scenes

As the masonic adviser in the private office, John Vazquez is the Mr Fix-it of Freemasons’ Hall, providing all the expertise, support and sometimes regalia to make sure that lodge meetings go without a hitch

Q: How did you come to work at Freemasons’ Hall?

A: Before I was called up to national service in Spain in the 1970s, I was working for a retailer in Oxford Street. My mother used to work at Freemasons’ Hall cleaning the Grand Temple and when I returned to the UK, she said there was as a job going as a porter. I took the role in 1980 and thought I’d eventually get back into retail management, but here I am thirty-three years later. I got to know the people and enjoyed it. Back then it was very family oriented and sometimes you felt that you’d rather stay in the Hall than go home.

When I first walked into the building, I thought how wonderful it was – I was amazed by it and still am. It’s not what you expect; there are lots of cubby holes and even now I’m discovering new things. My favourite place is room seventeen; everyone likes the Grand Temple and room ten, but I like room seventeen’s old-fashioned wood panels and the antique furniture.

‘I am still amazed by the Hall. It’s not what you expect; there are lots of cubby holes and even now I’m discovering new things.’

Q: What was your first lodge?

A: I became a member of the staff lodge, Letchworth, after the bylaws had changed to allow ‘downstairs’ staff to become full members. I then joined the half English, half Spanish St Barnabas Lodge. It was a dying lodge, maybe fourteen or so members, but it’s up to around fifty-two now. I get to meet such a wide variety of people – that’s the great thing about Freemasonry.

Q: When did you start helping to run events?

A: After becoming foreman porter, my job changed to deputy lodge liaison officer. When Nigel Brown came in as Grand Secretary, it developed into the role I have now: using my knowledge to look after the masonic events in the building. From Grand Lodge through to Provincial lodge meetings, I’m always in the background making sure everything is working.

My job is to ensure each day is perfect. I help set up rooms, making sure all the props are there, as well as providing advice. I want to make all the masons watching feel comfortable and for them to walk out with a smile on their face, saying what a wonderful day they’ve had. I’m a calm person and I say to people when they come for a meeting, ‘Don’t worry. If I look anxious, then start worrying, but until then assume everything’s OK.’ I try not to get too stressed.

‘I don’t have an average day, it’s not like working in an office. One side of my job is practical – it’s a good thing I was in the Scouts.’

It doesn’t matter who you are, I will treat you in the same way. It goes back to the principles of Freemasonry and it’s a wonderful thing about the Craft. You do get individuals who think they’re special and need reminding of where they are, that this is not their building: it’s mine and they should behave! I’m lucky that I’ve been here a long time and people know me, so if I say something is going to happen, then it will.

Q: How would you describe your job?

A: I’m a Mr Fix-it. I don’t have an average day and it’s not really like working in an office. One side of my job is practical, like replacing broken chairs, and I’m responsible for all the regalia, making sure it’s clean and repaired – it’s a good thing I was in the Scouts. But my job is also about understanding Freemasonry, knowing what you can and can’t do in a ceremony. If I know I can’t do it, then I know someone else probably can’t either. A lot of people do take my recommendations, but it’s only advice.

When we started hosting non-masonic events at the Hall, the Grand Tyler Norman Nuttall and I used to organise them. As demand increased, the external events were given to Karen Haigh to oversee and I now work closely with her to make sure our masonic and non-masonic events don’t clash. When we first held things like Fashion Week here, there were a few raised eyebrows from masons coming to the Hall, but I think they’re used to it now.

Q: Have things changed since you joined in 1980?

A: Freemasonry has opened up quite a lot, as much as people think it hasn’t. When I first came here you weren’t allowed to go to the Library and Museum unless you were a mason or accompanied by one. While basic masonry hasn’t changed, the people around it have. Younger masons are looking at things in a different way, which is good.

Freemasonry was here before I came and it’ll be here after I’m gone – just like this building. To me it’s a privilege and honour to come and work here. It was fantastic to be part of the two hundred and seventy-fifth anniversary celebrations in 1992 at Earls Court. There was a lot to organise; we had to set the arena up as the Temple and two lodges, but we got it done. It’s the same with the three hundredth celebrations. I won’t panic and I’m actually looking forward to it. We will make masons proud.

Thursday, 05 September 2013 01:00

James Bond's Aston Martin visits Freemasons' Hall

Driving the British way

Founded in London in 1913, Aston Martin celebrated one hundred years of manufacturing the world’s most luxurious and recognisable sports cars at Freemasons’ Hall. With James Bond’s DB5 pulling up outside, we take a look inside a very exclusive birthday party

On a hot summer Saturday night in mid-July, a glittering black-tie party for one thousand Aston Martin owners and invited guests descended on Freemasons’ Hall on Great Queen Street to celebrate one hundred years of the classic car marque. With Downton Abbey’s Joanne Froggatt and Allen Leech in attendance, the event featured entertainment from Radio 1 DJ Benji B, composer Grant Windsor and the Deviation Strings ensemble.

The celebration in the capital was the culmination of a week-long programme of centenary activity that included driving tours across Europe as well as a host of events at the brand’s Gaydon headquarters in Warwickshire. Over the same weekend, tens of thousands of enthusiasts had made the trip to London’s Kensington Gardens to witness the largest gathering ever of the iconic British cars. On display in the Royal Park or at nearby Perks Field were as many as five hundred and fifty Aston Martin models – worth around an estimated £1 billion in total.

Classics old and new

Aston Martin CEO Dr Ulrich Bez said: ‘Exclusivity is a key part of the Aston Martin mystique – we have made only around sixty-five thousand cars in our entire one hundred-year history to date – so to see so many of these rare beauties gathered together in London was a truly historic occasion.’

Themed car displays told Aston Martin’s remarkable story. The event’s centrepiece, the Centenary Timeline Display, on the Broadwalk, took visitors on a one hundred-year journey from the origins of the brand in Henniker Mews, Chelsea, to its current global headquarters in the Midlands.

Every significant Aston Martin road car was represented, from ‘A3’, the oldest surviving car, which dates from 1921, to the Centenary Edition Vanquish, and the thrilling new V12 Vantage S and Vanquish Volante. The exceptional CC100 Speedster concept model, meanwhile, provided a tantalising glimpse of the potential shape of the brand’s cars in years to come.

Elsewhere in the park a Centenary Selection display showcased the diverse and highly bespoke nature of the brand. This varied line-up revealed cars rarely seen outside of private collections, including a brace of new Zagato models, a trio of Bertone Jets, and a number of other unique cars commissioned over the years by passionate customers worldwide.

To top it all, Aston Martin’s association with James Bond was marked with a display of seven of the movies’ cars. Back at Freemasons’ Hall, actor Ewan McGregor posed happily alongside a DB5 from the latest Bond blockbuster, Skyfall, adding a flourish of Hollywood glamour to an evening that celebrated a car marque with true star quality.

Published in Features

Reading between the lines

Never shy of a controversy, Dan Brown’s decision to launch his new novel at Freemasons’ Hall revealed the bestselling author’s true feelings about the Craft, as Anneke Hak discovered

Freemasons are quietly accepting about the fact that the media and writers can tend to misinform the general public about the goings on behind the closed doors of masonic lodges. However, when a hugely popular fiction writer, who once provoked the headline ‘Does the Catholic Church need to worry about Dan Brown?’, decided to write a book focusing on masonic groups, it was naturally a cause for concern.

As it happened, The Lost Symbol came and passed without much of a to-do as far as Freemasonry was concerned. While dabbling in some colourful descriptions of red wine being drunk out of a skull during the initiation ritual, the book actually depicts Freemasonry as a benign and even misunderstood organisation. So when Brown was in London to publicise Inferno, his latest book in the Robert Langdon saga, Freemasons’ Hall was delighted to be approached about holding ‘An Evening With Dan Brown’, hosted by Waterstones.

‘We see the Dan Brown evening and all other outside events that we do as a means of showing people we are open,’ says John Hamill, masonic historian and a past librarian at the United Grand Lodge of England and Wales. ‘We are here, you can hold events, you can come and go round the building, you can use the library and museum, you can ask questions, and questions will be answered. It is all part of the whole process of being much more public about Freemasonry.’

Although Brown’s books may encourage persistent rumours, which liken Freemasonry to a secret cult, the writer himself is wholly complimentary of the group. He told The Independent before the event that he would be honoured to be a mason. ‘I’ve nothing but admiration for an organisation that essentially brings people of different religions together,’ he said. ‘Rather than saying “we need to name God”, they use symbols such that everybody can stand together … Freemasonry is not a religion but a venue for people to come together across the boundaries of their specific religions. It levels the playing field.’

All in good spirit

John managed to speak with Brown amidst the hustle and bustle before the event. ‘We talked about The Lost Symbol and the hype beforehand, and he said he couldn’t understand it because where he grew up in America, he lived four blocks from the local lodge and knew some of the Freemasons. He said, “Why would I want to attack one of the few organisations that’s still doing good in society?” ’

While Brown often says that the secret societies and groups within his novels are based on fact, with a whole lot of poetic license thrown in for colour, his readers aren’t always able to differentiate between what’s real and what’s added for entertainment’s sake. However, rather than portray the Freemasons as malignant, The Lost Symbol says that the group provides a fraternity that does not discriminate in any way – it is something, Brown argued at the time, that Freemasons should be pleased about. You would think so, too, considering that The Lost Symbol broke a whole slew of records, including becoming the UK’s bestselling adult hardcover since records began, and has been translated into dozens of languages.

Taking centre stage

So would the publicists use the opportunity of a Dan Drown book event at Freemasons’ Hall to garner media attention through the use of mock rites of passage and men in sweeping black cloaks? Thankfully, no. Having attended many events at Freemasons’ Hall, some with Egyptian sphinxes littering the corridors and others with eerie music for ambience, it was gratifying to find that An Evening With Dan Brown was refreshingly simple, drawing on the fantastic building to hold the interest of the budding writers while they waited for the man himself.

The author graciously thanked Grand Secretary Nigel Brown and Karen Haigh of Freemasons’ Hall for allowing Waterstones to use the venue for the event and described spending many hours in disguise at the building completing research for his last book. ‘What a room!’ he exclaimed on entering the hall and stepping up to the microphone.

‘I was actually here maybe six years ago, incognito, doing research for The Lost Symbol. Today, without my dark glasses on, it’s a whole lot prettier. It’s a real honour for me to be here today.’ Dan Brown

John asked Brown about his undercover trips to Freemasons’ Hall and discovered that the author would join tours, asking the librarians a lot of questions on his way around: ‘He said that they were very helpful. They must have wondered who this man was with so many questions.’

Having referenced Freemasonry during his speech, and admired the glorious building, Brown then turned the conversation to the main topic of the night: his latest book, Inferno. Largely inspired by Dante’s Divine Comedy, which charts a journey through the three domains of the afterlife, the book has already sparked a whole new set of controversies as scholars argue over whether or not the author should be simplifying the historical elements while popularising this epic fourteenth-century poem.

One thing is apparent, however: Brown seems to have given Freemasonry his seal of approval.

 

 

Letters to the editor - No. 23 Autumn 2013

Dan Brown at Freemasons' Hall

Sir,

Whilst sitting waiting for Dan Brown to arrive on 21 May at Freemasons’ Hall, I watched the reaction of the diverse group of people who had obviously for the first time seen your wonderful building. Undoubtedly most were in awe, as well they should be. 

For me, being at the Hall had a more poignant resonance. My father was a Freemason and he had taken me up to the Hall on many occasions. Sitting there, I wondered what he would have made of the event where people from all walks of life were able to sit and enjoy the full beauty of the building whilst at the same time listening to a man who had weaved the Freemasons into his stories that have sold billions of books around the world. 

As a child I was fascinated by the society simply because my father was a member. 

I began to devour any literature on the subject so that one day I could impress him with my knowledge. One day I had the chance and he was speechless. His friends thought he had provided me with the knowledge. I explained that if you want to learn about Freemasonry, the information is readily available. 

Now years later, I read some of the nonsense on forums on the web after Dan’s evening and was disappointed how people are still today showing complete ignorance on the subject and not even bothering to research before they put their names to ridiculous statements. 

When I mentioned to my friends that I would be coming to use your library for research they were shocked, because they didn’t realise how readily you share knowledge with the public. My father taught me to be open and generous to other philosophies and religions; he joined the Freemasons for all the right reasons and I think in retrospect he would have agreed with your continuing to open your doors to the public – although he may have found the constant chatter in the Hall whilst waiting for Dan Brown a tad tiresome. Ultimately, it was just brilliant to sit and admire the beautiful architecture of the great Hall again!

Lena Walton, Tadworth, Surrey

 

 

 

 

Published in Features

Grand Lodge statement on masonic emblem

Complaints have been received about an advert offering for sale cufflinks and lapel pins in the form of a replica of the Hall Stone Jewel. Informal approaches had previously been made to the individual concerned, advising that the design was inappropriate and requesting that he ceased to market the items.

The Board of General Purposes concluded that the design in this context is altogether inappropriate. The device is inextricably associated with Freemasons’ Hall, which was built as a memorial to masons who gave their lives during World War I.  

Except in the case of the small number of brethren still living who subscribed to the Masonic Million Memorial Fund and thereby qualified to wear an individual jewel, the privilege of wearing the Hall Stone Jewel is now restricted to the Masters of lodges whose donations to the Fund averaged 10 guineas per member, and the Provincial or District Grand Master of the Hall Stone Province (Buckinghamshire) and the Hall Stone District (Burma). The Board considered that turning such an iconic emblem into an item of personal adornment was in the worst possible taste and deeply disrespectful to the memory of the many fallen members of the Craft.   

It also noted that a donation to ‘Masonic Charity’ is promised for every sale made, which it regards as an attempt to give respectability to an enterprise that appears to have been undertaken for personal gain. The Board recommends that brethren of this Constitution neither purchase nor wear such items.

Published in UGLE
Thursday, 05 September 2013 01:00

Grand Secretary's column - Autumn 2013

It was tremendous to hear the news of the new Royal baby, Prince George. You will be glad that a message of congratulations was sent on behalf of members to Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. 

Talking of good news, it is heart-warming to hear, as I go around the Provinces and Districts, more and more members speaking openly about the fun of membership as they enjoy, each in their own special way, their hobby, Freemasonry. This enjoyment is becoming infectious, helping to both recruit and, importantly, retain members. Together with the increasing support from family members, this is a clear reflection of the success of the current initiatives that are making sure there is a relevant future for Freemasonry.

In this autumn issue, we take a ride with the Showmen’s Lodge to discover that the ties binding Freemasons can also be found in the people who run the waltzers and dodgems at the fairground. We go on the road with a welfare adviser from the Royal Masonic Trust for Girls and Boys, as she helps a family get back on its feet. We also meet Mark Smith, a Provincial Grand Almoner, and find out that while masonic support can involve making a donation to a worthy cause, it is also about spending time with people in your community.

I mentioned hobbies earlier, and to thrill anyone with a taste for classic cars we get in the driving seat with Aston Martin as it celebrates its one hundredth birthday at Freemasons’ Hall. There is also an interview with Prestonian Lecturer Tony Harvey, who has been travelling around the UK to explain how Freemasonry and Scouting have more in common than you might first think. I believe that these stories and features show why Freemasonry not only helps society but is also very much a part of it. 

On a final note, I was pleased to have had the opportunity to speak on Radio 4’s Last Word obituary programme about the late Michael Baigent, our consultant editor. He was a good friend with an enormously inquisitive mind, about which John Hamill writes more fully later in this issue of Freemasonry Today.

Nigel Brown
Grand Secretary

‘It is heart-warming to hear, as I go around the Provinces and Districts, more and more members speaking openly about the fun of membership.’

Published in UGLE

It’s a small world

Dressing up is more than child’s play, as Ellie Fazan discovered when she attended Global Kids Fashion Week at Freemasons’ Hall

Outside Freemasons’ Hall, a photographer snaps a blonde in sunglasses and red-soled shoes easing herself out of a chauffeur-driven car. Clutching an immaculately presented baby in a pink tutu and sparkly headband, she’s here for the first ever Global Kids Fashion Week.

Organised by online retailers AlexandAlexa.com, which specialises in luxury childrenswear and educational toys, the event aims to showcase kids’ fashion as a fun and creative industry, highlighting it as a thriving platform in its own right, not just an ‘add on’ to the adult fashion industry.

With so many of London Fashion Week’s outstanding events taking place at Freemasons’ Hall, it was a natural choice for the inaugural Global Kids Fashion Week to follow suit. ‘We love the heritage of Freemasons’ Hall and its location is great. It’s easily accessible for the media and our guests from across London, as well as for our international visitors. The team have been wonderful to work with,’ says Alex Theophanous, CEO of AlexandAlexa.com

The emphasis is clearly on fun. A giant pink tree is dressed with puffy clouds of candyfloss and the champagne traditionally quaffed by the fashion crowd has been done away with in favour of cartons of juice, while a waitress hands out popcorn from a fairground-style machine. As they settle into their seats, girls in over-the-top party frocks and boys looking slightly less comfortable in slick suits delve into their goodie bags. It’s fair to say they are just as excited by the toys they find inside as what’s going on around them.

‘Just because it’s fun doesn’t mean this isn’t a serious business. It turns out that little people are very big business indeed’

A model performance

Adults make up the majority of the audience, which, as at other fashion shows, comprises celebrities (model Jodie Kidd and make-up artist Charlotte Tilbury are in the front row) as well as industry insiders. Only this time they’ve brought their children, and instead of sitting in moody silence they coo and giggle as the show begins.

The mini models take to the catwalk in new-season looks from brands such as SuperTrash Girls, which creates clothes specifically for children, and designer labels such as Chloé, which has branched out into childrenswear. Looks range from super bright and colourful to retro outfits with more than a hint of seaside nostalgia; from edgy rock star looks to adult mini-me clothes for baby fashionistas.

Some of the kids pout and swagger like pure professionals; others look a bit more stunned by the experience. But they’ve all been specially picked from acting and stage schools and by the end of the show are having such a riot that they forget to leave the stage and carry on dancing as a glitter cannon showers them in gold confetti.

Just because it’s fun, however, doesn’t mean this isn’t a serious business. It turns out that little people are very big business indeed. AlexandAlexa.com has seen a one hundred and fifty per cent growth in the past year and in the UK alone the children’s fashion market is estimated to be worth £650 million a year. But this isn’t just another clever marketing ploy to get people to spend more; all the money raised by this fashion show is being donated to Kids Company, a charity set up to provide support to vulnerable inner-city children.

‘We have worked with Kids Company in the past on fashion shows and have always admired its work. Also, a lot of the counselling that Kids Company undertakes is through the creative arts, which made it a perfect fit with our fashion agenda,’ explains Theophanous.

‘Wearing clothes is an aspect of their self-presentation that they can have control over’ – Camila Batmanghelidjh

Finding confidence

The link between Kids Company and fashion isn’t as tenuous as it might first seem. Many of the children who come to the charity for help lack even the most basic clothes, and as Camila Batmanghelidjh, founder and director of Kids Company, explains: ‘For children who have experienced profound humiliation as a consequence of childhood maltreatment, wearing good clothes is the first step towards piecing together their shattered dignity.

It is also an aspect of their self-presentation that they can have control over.’

Kids Company has been working with young people to capture their thoughts on how fashion needs to embrace childhood and adolescence more appropriately. ‘It is in this context that we were really happy to partner with Global Kids Fashion Week,’ says Batmanghelidjh, adding that two of the youngsters from Kids Company worked backstage, gaining valuable work experience in the process.

After the show, chaos rules at an after party with nail painting, a photo booth and more popcorn. But this refreshing burst of colour and energy is contained within an anteroom. In the Hall’s grand hallway, normal activity carries on, oblivious to the confetti, the children and the candyfloss.

Gradually the crowd trickles away, parents taking their children by the hand, ushering them through Freemasons’ Hall. They are silenced by its size and greatness, and majesty reigns once more.

ABOUT KIDS COMPANY

 

Founded by Camila Batmanghelidjh, in 1996, Kids Company aims to provide practical and emotional support to vulnerable inner-city children. It reaches out to thirty-six thousand young people, of whom eighteen thousand receive intensive support. In extreme cases, the charity clothes, feeds and houses them; for others, it works towards creating a safe family environment and offers opportunities and support they would not otherwise receive.

 

The charity has developed a unique philosophy using the arts therapeutically and educationally in order to reach and assist traumatised children – and statistics show that this approach works.

 

Around eighty-one per cent of the young people who come to the charity are involved in crime; eighty-four per cent have experienced homelessness; and eighty-three per cent have sustained trauma. After Kids Company’s intervention, findings indicate a ninety per cent reduction in criminal activity, with ninety-one per cent of children going back into education and sixty-nine per cent finding employment.

 

www.kidsco.org.uk

Published in Features

Adrian’s festival walk

To mark the launch of the Yorkshire North and East Ridings 2018 Festival, Adrian Jessop donned his trainers for charity to walk from York to London in fourteen days, arriving at Freemasons’ Hall on 11 June. ‘None of us know if or when we may need to call on help, or suffer an illness where treatment is limited or not available,’ Adrian says. ‘This is my way of supporting a fantastic charity achieving great things by helping others.’

To support Adrian, donate at www.justgiving.com/walking-4-relief or text WALK18 £10 to 70070

Published in Masonic Samaritan Fund
Page 11 of 15

ugle logo          SGC logo